Visiting Student Elective Course Descriptions


Visiting Student | Class Selections

Department of Anatomy & Structural Biology (ANTS)

A100 Human Gross Anatomy

The Human Gross Anatomy elective provides an advanced level, anatomical review of selected regions of the human body in preparation for residencies in surgically-oriented specialties, diagnostic imaging, and radiology. Elective students are required to participate in cadaveric dissection. The goals of dissecting are to enhance the experience and the knowledge base of the elective student. The elective is held in the Dissection Laboratories on the 6th floor of the Forchheimer building.

Regions of the body covered in this elective are:
Back & Thorax
Abdomen
Pelvis & Perineum
Head & Neck
Upper & Lower Limb

At the end of the elective students will be able to:

  • Discuss and demonstrate the organizational principles of the specific region of the body.
  • Describe how the anatomy relates to the function of the specific region of the body.
  • Demonstrate the key anatomical structures and relations of the specific region of the body.

There is NO maximum limit on number of students who can sign up for this elective. Students do NOT need the approval of the Course Director to register for the elective AND the Course Director appreciates that many students who sign up for these modules may be doing interviews that will take them away from the College. Every effort will be made to accommodate interviews during each module.

Adi Pinks, PhD
adi.pinkas@einsteinmed.org
(718) 430-4260

Priti Mishall, MD
priti.mishall@einsteinmed.org
(718) 430-3423

Administrative Support: Iris Villatoro
Iris.villatoro@einsteinmed.org
718-430-2973

Blocks: 1- 2, & 13 -14
On the first day of the elective students should report to Dr. Pinkas’ office, 620 Forchheimer.

A400 Student as Teacher

(Einstein and MMC)

**NOT OFFERED IN THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2022-2023**

The word doctor is derived from the Latin verb docere, meaning to teach. At many points during a physician’s career, from medical school through residency and into practice, he or she will be expected to educate peers, students, and faculty. This elective seeks to provide fourth year medical student-teachers (STs) the opportunity to gain and develop pedagogical knowledge, skills, and attitudes. We will accomplish this through three approaches: a standard didactic curriculum, opportunities for practical application of theoretical learning, and, finally, the expectation to work with a faculty member of their choice on a curricular enhancement project (discussed below).

Currently, many opportunities exist for fourth-year students to teach at Einstein. Between electives assisting in the anatomy labs to leading small group case conferences as part of the MCFM course, students who are interested in education can find opportunities to teach. This elective seeks to consolidate these opportunities. Additionally, this elective will create a didactic curriculum for interested students to learn about educational principles in adult education as well as learning environments specific to clinical medicine (i.e. precepting). The didactic curriculum also utilizes currently-existing opportunities such as lessons from the ongoing Resident-as-Teacher program in the Montefiore Department of Internal Medicine, and the graduate course “Fundamentals of Course Design and Teaching”.

The product is an elective that continues an Einstein tradition (initiated by Dr. Richard Hayes prior to his death), materializes learning objectives that are stated within the Physician as Educator curricular sub-competencies, and provides the framework for the growth of medical education innovation at Einstein.

Michael Risley, PhD
michael.risley@einsteinmed.org
718-430-2389
Sheira Schlair, MD, MS
sheira.schlair@einsteinmed.org
718-862-1782
Blocks: TBD
Max: 2

On the first day, students report to Forchheimer Building Room 620S. Please contact Dr. Risley for time.

Epidemiology and Population Health (EPID)

F200 Jewish Medical Ethics

The advances in modern medicine have spawned a wide variety of ethical dilemmas in such areas as genetics, reproductive technology, the determination of death, organ, transplantation, euthanasia, and assisted suicide. While the secular ethical approach to these issues is often well publicized and adequately represented at many medical schools, the religious viewpoint, and in particular, that of Orthodox Judaism, is rarely given a voice. This half-module (one month) guided reading elective allows the student to choose a topic of their interest and will provide an overview of the Orthodox Jewish approach to medical issues by analyzing texts from the Bible, Talmud, and Rabbinic commentaries throughout the ages.

Prerequisites: As many of the texts are in the Hebrew language, a rudimentary knowledge of Hebrew would be helpful, although not essential.

Rabbi Edward Reichman, MD
646-702-0155.
saraneddie@optonline.net
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2 students

F204 Nutrition and the Development of Chronic Disease

This course is designed to promote active self-directed learning related nutrition while collaborating on team-oriented research. Students will have the opportunity to choose a nutrition issue to investigate via a literature review or a service-based learning project. The course will introduce students to data resources for examining nutrition-related policies. behaviors, and health indices at the local, state, national, and global levels. Each student will develop an individual plan for a narrative literature review or service project with guidance from course faculty.

Week 1: During the first week, students will develop aims and an action plan their project or review.

Week 2: Students will focus on implementing project procedures/review methods for gathering information . For literature reviews, students be selecting articles, develop tables to compare study designs, populations, methods, and outcomes. For service projects, students will be compiling information through data collection as well as other methods

Week 3: Students will continue their work and start to synthesize information to develop “lessons learned”

Week 4: Students will complete F204 review paper or service project component(s). Develop any plans for future work.

Faculty

Heather Archer-Dyer. MPH
Heather.Archer-Dyer@einsteinmed.edu

Judith Wylie-Rosett, EdD
718-430-3345
judith.wylie-rosett@einsteinmed.edu
Blocks: All
Maximum: 4 students

Students should contact the instructors before the start of the elective for meeting time and location.

F205 Clinical Informatics and Research in Primary Care

Students will participate in implementing a web-based curriculum for using electronic health records (EHRs) and other “big data” sources to conduct clinical and translational research in primary care by joining a research team at Clinical Directors Network (CDN). CDN (see www.CDNetwork.org) is a national primary care practice-based research network (PBRN) headquartered in NYC,  and CDN’s N2-PBRN is an AHRQ-designated Center of Excellence (P30) for primary care practice-based research and learning (see https://pbrn.ahrq.gov/pbrn-profiles/p30-centers) that is a network of 12 established PBRNs, three clinical data research networks, a health information exchange and several other electronic data sources.  These ongoing clinical and health services research projects are designed to develop, evaluate and disseminate evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for clinicians practicing in underserved community-based primary care settings, such as Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), Emergency Departments (EDs) and other Community Health Centers (CHCs).

Learning experience :

Students will help with curriculum development and evaluation, identification of online clinical decision-support tools, and developing presentations at Community Health Centers, as well as assist with (and receive co-authorship) development of scientific presentations and publications. Students will participate in research trainings from a PCORI-funded study, Enhancing Community Health Center PCORI Engagement (EnCoRE – see www.CDNetwork.org/ENCORE) whose goal is to adapt, enhance, and implement a training curriculum designed to educate and engage Health Center teams including patients, clinical and administrative staff in Patient Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR).

Measurable learning objectives of elective :

  • Learn to distinguish between observational and experimental studies
  • Distinguish among laboratory, physiological, clinical, patient-reported, and public health outcomes
  • Understand differences between comparative effectiveness research (CER), patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR), dissemination and implementation research (DIR)
  • Identify strategies to combine clinical and patient-reported outcomes in research
  • Recognize the strengths and limitations of using existing “Big Data” sources such as Electronic Health Records (EHRs) and administrative datasets for conducting clinical research

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Student and Elective Director will complete a survey

Textbook(s) information (If you have a textbook(s) that are either required or suggested reading, please provide this information as it is mandated by the U.S. Department of Education.

Location of elective (hospital): Meetings are held at the NYC offices of Clinical Directors Network (CDN) 5 West 37th Street, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10018, as well as onsite at participating Federally Qualified Health Centers in the metropolitan NYC area, and via web/telephone conference calls.

Jonathan N. Tobin, PhD
212-382-0699 ext 234
jonathan.tobin@einstein.yu.edu or JNTobin@CDNetwork.org
Administrative support: Melissa Samanoglu
CDNResearch2@CDNetwork.org
212-382-0699 ext 227
Blocks: All
Maximum: 4 students

On the first day students report to: Dr.Tobin at CDN Headquarters, 5 Wet 37th Street, 10th Floor New York NY at 9:00am (please confirm location and time by phone/email)

FM520 Research-based Health Activism

(Einstein/Montefiore Medical Center)

** NOT OFFERED DURING 2022 – 2023 ACADEMIC YEAR**

This four week elective will offer motivated 4th year medical students an opportunity to develop skills and knowledge in research methods, health policy, and advocacy. Learning experiences range from seminars with leading health policy experts to skill-building workshops with health care activists. Each student is expected to develop a research proposal and advocacy plan that addresses a health care issue of his or her choosing. Following the course, projects are completed in the remaining academic year with ongoing mentorship.

Learning Objectives:
Following completion of this course, learners will be able to:

1. Describe the concept of Research Based Health Activism
2. Develop a feasible research question to better understand health disparities in their communities
3. List ways that physicians participate in advocacy for individual patients, within health systems, and at a policy level
4. Utilize multiple advocacy skills: public speaking, writing op-eds, meeting with legislators

Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback at the midpoint and end of the elective. Evaluation will be based on attendance, effort during seminars, completion of weekly assignments, and presentation of project proposal.

Typical Schedule: Morning and afternoon seminars running from 9 am – 5 pm. Thursdays are free for project development, homework assignments, and one-on-one mentorship. There is no clinical duty or call schedule.

Textbook Information: (Suggested)
Hulley, SB, Cummings SR, Browner WS, Grady D, Hearst N, Newman TB. Designing Clinical Research (2nd Edition). Philadephia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2001.
ISBN: 9781608318049
Cost: $75.99

Musaub Khan, MD
mkhan6@montefiore.org
718-920-7173
Maximum Students: 15
Block: May 2023 (TBD)

On the first day students report to Division of General Internal Medicine (3300 Kossuth Ave, Bronx, NY 10467)

Anesthesiology (ANES)

E201 Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology

(Montefiore Medical Center)

The department of Anesthesiology is proud to offer an elective rotation available to senior medical students in cardiac anesthesia. The rotation will consist of a 4-week block and should be undertaken by those students who have a previous exposure to general anesthesiology. During this rotation, the medical student will assist inpatient care while obtaining a fundamental understanding of how a cardiac surgical case is managed by the anesthesiology team. They will be involved in the didactics during this month, which will be provided, by the attending anesthesiologist, the three cardiac anesthesia fellows, and the cardiac resident.

Goals:

1. Preoperative assessment: The medical student will be responsible for reviewing patient medical records and laboratory studies. They will form an anesthetic plan and discuss it with the team. The assessment will include physical examination with an understanding of angiographic and echocardiographic findings.

2. Intraoperative: Medical students will be expected to assist with patient monitoring. They will learn the necessary access for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The medical student will understand the need for placement of central lines, arterial lines, and peripheral IV lines. In most cases, central venous access will be performed by the resident, but in certain cases; the medical student may perform part of this procedure as well. Medical students will obtain an understanding of all monitors used during cardiac surgery (EKG, arterial tracing, CVP tracing, PAP tracing). A brief introduction to transesophageal echocardiography will take place in the operating room.

3. Postoperative: Medical students on this rotation will follow their patients during the hospitalization. This will provide them with an understanding of the complex follow-up that cardiac surgical patients endure. The postoperative checks will be discussed with another member of the cardiac team.

Didactic Goals:

1. Cardiopulmonary bypass
2. Ischemic heart disease
3. Valvular heart disease
4. Congestive heart failure (Ventricular assist devices, cardiac transplant)
5. Pacemakers
6. Management of coagulopathy
7. Monitors
8. Anticoagulation

Reading:
A copy of the chapter on cardiac anesthesia by Barash will be provided to each medical student during the rotation. This will be supplemented with other sources as deemed necessary.

Course Director:
Dr. Jason Adkins , MD
jaadkins@montefiore.org 
718-920-4316
Administrative support:
Beverly Mcgonagle, bmcgonag@montefiore.org
Ms. Debbie Lopez, deblopez@montefiore.org
718-920-4383
Blocks:
All
Maximum: 2

 

E501 Sub-Residency in Clinical Anesthesiology

(Montefiore Medical Center)

This 4 week rotation in anesthesiology will expose students to the anesthetic management and care of patients in the peri-operative period. Students will experience anesthetic care for a large variety of cases, encompassing all surgical sub-specialties. The overall goal of this elective is for students to acquire a basic understanding of the physiology, pharmacology, and clinical management involved in anesthesia care and peri-operative medicine.

At the end of this rotation, Students will be expected to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to perform the fundamental components of the preoperative evaluation
  • Demonstrate the core principles and techniques of airway management
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the pharmacology of agents used for anesthesia
  • Demonstrate an understanding of standard monitoring employed for patients undergoing general and regional anesthesia
  • Be familiar with the basics of invasive monitoring
  • Be acquainted with the modalities available to treat acute pain
  • Have an appreciation of the anesthesiologist as a care provider/problem solver in the hospital and outpatient settings

Students will be expected to arrive daily (Monday-Friday) at 6:30 to help set up the operating room for anesthetic care. Students will then participate in the preoperative evaluation, the intra-operative management, and the postoperative care of their patients. The day will end in the mid afternoon when students will pick up their room assignments for the following day. Students will be paired with a mentor for the rotation who will help reach educational goals. All students will be expected to spend time exploring subspecialties in anesthesiology. Lectures will be given 3 times per week. Further detailed instructions will be sent to students prior to starting the elective. Evaluation will be from attending anesthesiologists the students have worked with.

Required Text Book:
Understanding Anesthesiology A Learner’s Guide by Dr. Karen Raymer, MD, MSc, FRCP(C)Clinical Professor, Department of Anesthesia, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University

Michael Rufino, MD
mrufino@montefiore.org
Administrative support:
Beverly Mcgonagle, bmcgonag@montefiore.org
Ms. Debbie Lopez, deblopez@montefiore.org
718-920-4383
Blocks:
All
Maximum: 10

 

E502 Basic Transesophageal Echocardiography

(Montefiore Medical Center-Moses)

Echocardiography is a diagnostic modality that is being increasingly utilized by non-cardiologists such as emergency room and critical care physicians. In this rotation, students will be exposed to echocardiography in the perioperative period, primarily transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in cardiac surgery. Working with our TEE board-certified cardiac anesthesiologists, students will see first hand how echo is routinely used to guide cardiac operations and anesthetic management. Students will have the opportunity to practice image acquisition on our TEE simulator, and after demonstrating competency, perform exams on patients. The rotation will emphasize the interpretation of TEE images in a wide variety of cardiac surgery patients, and how it correlates to anatomy and physiology. Students will also be exposed to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and its utility in the perioperative period.

Measurable learning objectives of elective: By the end of the rotation, students will be expected to:
• Understand appropriate use of echocardiography, including indications and contraindications.
• Be familiar with basic ultrasound and Doppler physics as it pertains to echocardiography.
• Know the views in the basic perioperative TEE exam and the associated anatomy.
• Be familiar with quantitative and qualitative methods to assess ventricular and valvular function.
• Demonstrate safe probe manipulation and proper image acquisition.

Learning experience: Students will primarily be in the cardiac surgery operating rooms, working intimately with cardiac anesthesiology attendings, as well as fellows and residents on rotation. Students will be expected to arrive daily (Monday to Friday) at 6:30 am to help set up for cases. For each day, the chief fellow will direct the student which operating room to report to ahead of time. Students will also be expected to visit other cardiac operating rooms during the day to review TEE exams. Students are also required to attend any didactic sessions for the fellows and residents relating to cardiac anesthesiology. When time is available, students will practice TEE skills on the simulator with faculty and fellows. Students interested in TTE will also have an opportunity to learn TTE on the simulator or with the Department of Cardiology.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Students will be required to maintain a log of all exams interpreted and performed under supervision. Students will also be assigned reading material from the course text and may be tested on the material on an ongoing basis. The TEE simulator will be used to assess knowledge of anatomy and if students will be allowed to perform exams on patients. At the end of the rotation, students will present an interesting case to the faculty and fellows. During the presentation, students will be evaluated on knowledge and interpretation and will serve as an end-of-rotation exam.

Textbook(s) information:
ISBN ISBN-13: 978-0702034275
Cost $74.73 (On amazon.com)
Title Practical Perioperative Transesophageal Echocardiography: Text with DVD-ROM
Edition: 2nd edition
Author: David Sidebotham
Is this required or suggested? Required. Department will provide copies for students to borrow.

Dr. Jason Adkins , MD
jaadkins@montefiore.org 
718-920-4316
Administrative support:
Beverly Mcgonagle, bmcgonag@montefiore.org
Ms. Debbie Lopez, deblopez@montefiore.org
718-920-4383 or 4308
Maximum: 1
Blocks: All

On the first day students report to: Moses Campus Silver Zone 4th Floor- Department of Anesthesiology Graduate Education Office at 8:30 AM

E600 Regional Anesthesia and Inpatient Pain Medicine

(Hutchinson Campus/Wakefield)

The goal of the Regional Anesthesia and Inpatient Pain Medicine Rotation is to enhance the medical student’s overall knowledge, understanding, and application of regional anesthesia and inpatient acute and chronic pain medicine principles. Clinical experience in the ASU, OR, PACU, ICU, and inpatient Floor will provide exposure to all aspects of regional anesthetic and inpatient pain medicine practice in a busy tertiary care medical center. Students should expect significant hands on experience and anesthesia team/pain service member responsibility.

Learning objectives: At the conclusion of the elective the student is expected to have the following skills:
– Understand pre-operative assessment principles to determine if a particular patient is a candidate for a regional anesthetic technique.
– Identify the best regional anesthetic technique and perioperative analgesia for a particular surgery.
– Understand the components of patient informed consent discussing all of the risks, benefits, and alternatives of the procedures.
– Basics of performing peripheral nerve blocks/catheters and spinal and epidural technique in regards to anatomy and landmarks.
– Gain an understanding of both nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques for a variety of blocks along with an ability to read and identify relevant sonoanatomy.
– Understand principles of patient assessment and plan for inpatient pain management consults utilizing the multidisciplinary approach to inpatient pain medicine.
– Able to discuss basic options for treatment of pain and utilization of opioids, NSAIDs, neuropathic, and other agents.

Learning experience: Students who have completed this elective will have an understanding of how a Regional Anesthesia and Inpatient Pain Service functions at an academic medical center. They will have an opportunity to learn use of ultrasound and identification of relevant anatomy as well as performing entry-level blocks. They will be present at the inpatient pain rounds with the acute pain team. The students will be at two main campuses, Wakefield and Hutchinson. The rotation will be Monday to Friday from 7 am to 3 pm. The rotating student will also be included in resident didactics in the rotation, including case conferences, journals clubs, and lectures. Interested students can also present a journal club. At the end of their rotation, the student will be expected to present a researched topic of interest to the team, in form of a lecture, decided on during the rotation, giving him/her an opportunity to further explore their interest in the field.

Recommended texts:
Textbook of Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain management by Admir Hadzic.
Students are also advised to use websites usra.ca and nysora.com to understand basics of ultrasound guided regional anesthesia.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Students will be given ongoing feedback during the rotation. They will be evaluated on their understanding of ultrasonography as well as sonographic anatomy and skill in performing entry-level blocks. Students will be evaluated by the course directors at the end of rotation also.

Course Director: Karina Gritsenko, MD
KGRITSEN@montefiore.org
917-468-4628
Co-Director: Kay Lee, MD
kaylee@montefiore.org
718-920-8946
Administrative support:
Beverly Mcgonagle, bmcgonag@montefiore.org
Ms. Debbie Lopez, deblopez@montefiore.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2 (If more than 2, contact course director)

On the first day student(s) report to: Wakefield Pre-Op/Block Area on the 2nd Floor of 600 East 233rd Street, Bronx, NY 10456 or Hutch PACU/Block Area on the 3rd Floor, Tower Two, 1250 Water Place, Bronx, NY 10461, at 6:45am. Please contact the Course Director, Dr. Karina Gritsenko prior to the start of the elective for where and when to report on the first day. Dr. Kay Lee, the Co-Director is also available for questions.

 

E602 Outpatient Chronic Pain Medicine

(Montefiore Medical Center-Hutchinson Campus)

The goal of the Outpatient Pain Medicine Rotation is to enhance the medical student’s overall knowledge, understanding, and application of outpatient chronic pain medicine practices. Clinical experience in the Montefiore Pain Center involves participation in both office visits as well as interventional pain procedures using both fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance and will provide exposure to all aspects of outpatient chronic pain medicine practice in a tertiary care medical center. Students should expect significant direct experience and chronic outpatient pain medicine service member responsibility.

Learning objectives: At the conclusion of the elective the student is expected to have the following skills:

  • Understand the components of comprehensive consultative patient assessments to determine type of pain and pain differential diagnosis.
  • Understand the different modalities used to treat chronic pain and learn to form a treatment plan involving different modalities, from medications to physical therapy to interventions.
  • Learn to identify the rationale for interventional treatment for specific pain conditions
  • Understand the components of patient informed consent discussing all of the risks, benefits, and alternatives of the procedures.
  • Understand basics of the technical aspects of simple interventional pain procedures under ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance.
  • Understand a multidisciplinary approach to outpatient chronic pain medicine while working with fellowship training pain medicine physicians from different primary specialties. This involves knowledge as to how pain medicine physicians work with the other specialties, as pain physicians work extensively with all specialties of medicine and refer patients to each other.
  • Understand the rationale for the different approaches in treatment of pain and discuss basic pharmacology of pain medications including opioids, NSAIDs, and other agents (such as anti-convulsants, anti-depressants, and anti-spasmodics) in the treatment of chronic pain in outpatients.

Learning experience: Students who have completed this elective will develop an understanding of how a Chronic Outpatient Pain Medicine Service functions at an academic medical center. The rotation schedule will be from 8:30 am to about 4 pm. They also have the opportunity to assist in performing image-guided interventions.

Recommend texts:
“Essentials of Pain Medicine and Regional Anesthesia, 3rd ed. by Benzon” and “Atlas of Image Guide Interventions, 2nd ed. by Rathmell”, both are available for the students to read in our library during the rotation. Most teaching will be “at the bedside” however the medical student will participate in teaching alongside the resident’s didactic schedule which includes lectures as well as articles from the literature. Students will be provided with the articles prior to the activity upon request. In addition, once a month there is an institution wide multidisciplinary spine/pain meeting that the student can attend with the pain service.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: The feedback will be given by the course director with input from the rotating attendings. Evaluation will be primarily on level of participation in meeting the stated objectives including quality of patient interactions, evaluations, and H&Ps.

 Amaresh Vydyanathan, MD
avydyana@montefiore.org
917-577-1811
Administrative support:
Beverly Mcgonagle, bmcgonag@montefiore.org
Ms. Debbie Lopez, deblopez@montefiore.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

On the first day student(s) report to: The Hutch metro center, 1250 Waters Place, Bronx, NY 10461 at 8:30 am Please contact the Course Director, Dr. Vydyanathan prior to the start of the elective for specifics before starting the rotation. The Pain clinic is on the 8th floor of Tower 2.

Emergency Medicine (EMED)

Only students strongly considering going into the field of EM should take the elective from May through December. Others are welcomed to take it during the rest of the year.

Students interested in K500 – Emergency Medicine must complete a full 4 week rotation. No exceptions will be made.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

K500 Emergency Medicine

(Jacobi Medical Center & Montefiore Medical Center)

**Not Available to International Exchange Students**

The EM rotation is a four-week elective for fourth-year students. Students will be rotating through the very busy EDs of Jacobi Medical Center and Montefiore Medical Center. Their clinical shifts will average 36-40 hours/week. Students will have direct patient care responsibilities under the supervision of ED attendings and senior residents. They will have the opportunity to evaluate and treat their own patients, perform procedures, and assist during resuscitations. In addition to bedside teaching, students will get several hours of mandatory workshops primarily focused on hands-on education. These workshops include airway management, suturing, simulation, IV placement, and ultrasound. Additionally, there will be hyperbaric and snake envenomation related site visits with associated lectures. This rotation is valuable and educational to students interested in all fields, but particularly to those applying to Emergency Medicine. There will be an opportunity for students to get mentoring from the faculty who are all EM trained.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Evaluations and final grades will be based on clinical performance, as well as grades on the end of rotation test and case presentation.

Textbook information: None required

Joshua Silverberg, MD
Joshua.Silverberg@nychhc.org
Contact: Ms. Elizabeth Morales, Elizabeth.Morales@nychhc.org, 718-918-5820 & Yadell Tavarez, tavarezy2@nychhc.org
Blocks: 1- 7
Maximum: 12-16

On the first day students report to Ms. Elizabeth Morales at Jacobi Medical Center, Building 6, Suite 1B25. Students must contact Ms. Morales two weeks prior to the start of the rotation to obtain the required clearance before the rotation begins, and for the meeting time. Reporting day/time may be changed if first day falls on a hospital holiday.

Family and Social Medicine (FMED)

 

For general questions regarding electives
in our department, please contact:

Ms. Adriana Nieto, 718-430-2900,
adriana.nieto@einsteinmed.edu


STEPS FOR PROCURING A FAMILY MEDICINE ELECTIVE

(These steps are for EINSTEIN STUDENTS ONLY. Visiting students should NOT contact the course director or contact person for approval. The Office of the Registrar will handle all approvals for visiting students.)

Step One: Arrangement and Approval from the Course Director

Einstein students MUST contact the course director or contact person (listed under each course below) for initial approval. Once approval has been received, the Office of the Registrar should be informed by the student.

Before
contacting the course director, please note the following policies:

Eligibility
All students attending a medical school outside of the US, or from a medical school which is not LCME-accredited, MUST contact the Einstein Office of the Registrar at Einstein-MDregistrar@einsteinmed.edu or 718-430-2102.

Availability
Rotations may occasionally be unavailable due to conflicting faculty responsibilities. Always confirm availability, and where to report on the first day of the rotation, directly with the sponsoring faculty.

Commitment

The student must commit to a minimum of 4 weeks in duration (see FM524 ECHO Free Clinic for detailed commitments).

Fourth-year students can take up to 3 days off to interview for residency programs with
advanced approval of the course director.

Unofficial electives and preceptorships are strongly discouraged and will not be approved.

Affiliate Sites

Jamaica Hospital
Family Medicine Residency Program

Contact Ms. Aja Holmes at

(718) 206-6919 or aholmes@jhmc.org.

Skip the rest of the steps below, as
Jamaica has its own application process.

Step Two:
Finalize with Department of Family and Social Medicine

The student and course director MUST contact our Department of Family and Social Medicine (DFSM), Medical Student Education Office via Adriana Nieto at adriana.nieto@einsteinmed.edu or 718-430-2900 to confirm mutual approval.

Step Three: Final Approval and Registration with the Office of Registrar

Visiting and Osteopathic students should view the Visiting Student website for detailed application requirements and instruction as to how and when to apply for electives. All paperwork and fee requirements must be satisfied before final approval is granted by the Office of the Registrar.

All students from Einstein, LCME-accredited medical schools and osteopathic medical schools are eligible to apply for electives listed below (see individual listings for electives that are only offered to Einstein students).
Once the student has satisfied all DFSM requirements, the DFSM will notify the Office of the Registrar. The Office of the Registrar will register students accordingly. Please check with the Office of the Registrar Einstein-MDRegistrar@einsteinmed.edu
 for more information regarding registration and final approval.


———————————————————————————————————————-


The following electives are offered by the faculty of the Department of Family and Social Medicine at Einstein through the Montefiore Family Medicine Residency Program (Bronx, NY), the Jamaica Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program (Jamaica, Queens), the Institute for Family Health (Bronx, Manhattan, and
Kingston, NY). Electives are available in the following categories:

COMMUNITY AND CULTURAL MEDICINE
FM530 Medical Spanish Immersion in the Bronx (Einstein / Institute for Family
Health)

GLOBAL HEALTH
FM529 Global Health in Guatemala (Montefiore)

HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS
FM524 ECHO Free Clinic Longitudinal Outreach (Einstein / Institute for Family
Health)

INPATIENT FAMILY MEDICINE
FM510 Family Medicine Inpatient Service (Montefiore)

PALLIATIVE CARE
FM528 Palliative Care (Montefiore)

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH
FM501 Reproductive Health (Montefiore)

SOCIAL MEDICINE
FM520 Research-Based Health Activism (Montefiore)

WOUND HEALING
FM506 Preceptorship in Wound Healing (Montefiore)

—————————————————————————————-

FM501 Reproductive Health

(Family Health Center: Bronx)

**Einstein & Visiting students must contact Dr. Gold for approval prior to registration**

General description: Clinical and reading elective focused on the provision of respectful and non-coercive patient-centered sexual and reproductive health care in the family medicine setting, using a reproductive justice and anti-racist framework. The elective is tailored to each student’s needs, interests, and experience.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:

On completion of this elective, students will be able to:

1. Describe strategies to integrate full-spectrum sexual and reproductive health care into routine family medicine practice

2. Demonstrate patient-centered contraceptive and abortion counseling

3. Apply a reproductive justice framework to sexual and reproductive health care

Learning experience:

The month will include clinical care with supervision, reading articles that cover clinical topics as well as the history of racism and oppression in sexual and reproductive health care, and reflection on experience/learning after each clinical session and reading assignments.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: written and oral

Marji Gold, MD
marji.gold@einsteinmed.edu
718-920-4678
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

Students need to contact Marji Gold at least one week prior to the rotation to clarify where to report on the first day.

 

FM506 Preceptorship in Wound Healing

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**Elective on pause for the Fall 2022, tentative for the Spring 2023. Visiting students must contact TBD for approval prior to registration**

Chronic wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, and pressure ulcers, are highly prevalent in chronically ill and elderly patients. They represent a significant public health burden and cause untold morbidity, disability, and mortality. In this elective, students will learn how to evaluate patients with chronic wounds; diagnose underlying factors that lead to physiologically impaired healing; formulate evidence-based treatment plans including topical, medical, surgical, and biologic treatment modalities; apply basic techniques of wound debridement; recognize secondary complications of wounds, and prevent wound recurrence. Upon completion of this elective, students will have the skills to become leaders in improving medical outcomes and quality of life for patients with chronic wounds. This course is highly relevant to students entering a variety of career paths, including but not limited to family medicine, internal medicine, surgery, plastic surgery, geriatrics, rehabilitation medicine, endocrinology, and infectious disease. Opportunities are available to participate in ongoing research in addition to clinical work. The elective can be tailored to student’s specific interests, in discussion with the instructor.

Objectives:

  • Evaluate patients with chronic wounds.
  • Diagnose underlying factors that lead to physiological impaired healing.
  • Formulate evidence-based treatment plans including topical, medical, surgical, and biologic treatment modalities.
  • Apply basic techniques of wound debridement. Recognize secondary complications of wounds. Prevent wound recurrence.
  • Understand health systems needs for wound patients.

Learning Experience:

Active participation in the inpatient Wound Healing consultation service. Outpatient care of patients with chronic wounds. Bimonthly nursing home Wound Rounds. Visits can be arranged to related services, e.g. hyperbaric medicine, home visits, vascular laboratory. The core schedule will include daily inpatient rounds, participation in bedside debridement, outpatient wound clinic 1-2 times per week, and nursing home rounds every other week. See consults at the 3 Montefiore campuses (Moses, Wakefield, and Weiler).

Feedback & Evaluation:

Students will receive formal feedback midway through the elective and at its completion. The evaluation is compiled by the supervising physician.

TBD
718-920-4678
Maximum: 1
Blocks: All

Students should contact Dr. Zinder 2 weeks prior to the start of the rotation for meeting location and time.

 

FM510 Family Medicine Inpatient Service

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**Einstein and visiting students must contact Dr. Santos for approval prior to registration**

**Visiting Students interested in this elective must submit a personal statement indicating why they are interested in this elective at Montefiore and what their interest/experience is in working with the underserved. Students must also submit a letter from their FM clerkship director, adviser, or dean verifying that they are going into Family Medicine.

The Acting Internship is a four-week rotation in the Family Medicine adult inpatient unit (NW7) at Montefiore Medical Center. During this rotation, the student will gain an understanding of the family physician’s role in the hospital management of patients. He/she will be expected to function at an intern level and carry the primary responsibility for his/her patient panel. The student will work within an interdisciplinary team to provide culturally appropriate and family-centered medical care. The focus will be on the patient as a whole person, and the student will address the medical, socioeconomic, and psychosocial issues to provide the best care for the patient. There will be opportunities to attend core Family Medicine and Social Medicine curriculum activities in the department.

Measurable learning objectives:

  • Obtain a comprehensive medical and social admission history on a patient admitted to the Family Medicine inpatient service.
  • Perform a complete and relevant physical exam on an adult patient admitted to the Family Medicine inpatient service.
  • Demonstrate clinical decision-making and problem-solving skills (e.g., prioritize urgent problems, recognize changes in patient status, utilize specialty consults, and adjust level of care).
  • Formulate a rational differential diagnosis for the presenting clinical symptoms based on history, physical exam, and diagnostic testing.
  • Formulate patient-centered treatment and management plans that integrate bio-psychosocial considerations and respect patient’s preferences
  • Demonstrate appropriate time management skills (e.g.  prioritize and complete tasks on-time).
  • Interpret and apply the results of routine labs and diagnostic tests
  • Formulate a patient and family-centered discharge plan encompassing longitudinal care, recognition of financial and insurance constraints, and other structural barriers to care.
  • Integrate patient-specific preventative and screening recommendations into management plans and health education counseling.
  • Communicate the rationale, risks, and benefits for procedures/treatments in clear, simple language to the patient and family (e.g., informed consent for procedures, treatment options).
  • Document all appropriate information clearly in the patient record.
  • Deliver an accurate and well-organized case presentation.
  • Communicate all relevant information at end of day and end of service coverage to appropriate members of the health care team (including outpatient primary care provider) and ancillary staff to ensure the continuous and optimum care of the patient.
  • Exhibit sensitive, reliable, and respectful behavior in interactions with patients, families, and colleagues.
  • Develop life-long, self-directed learning skills to appraise and apply evidence-based information to health problems encountered in the clinical setting.
  • Compose patient-centered and clinically appropriate orders and prescriptions.

Learning experience:

Students will work with the team, which is comprised not only of the medical staff but also includes nurses, social workers, a clinical pharmacist, and others. Acting interns will work up admissions, place orders, present patients on rounds, perform procedures, discuss management with consultants and formulate comprehensive discharge plans. They will encounter patients with diagnoses typical for an adult population in an academic medical center (e.g., pneumonia, CHF, renal failure, alcoholism, and COPD). Acting interns will participate in the team’s call schedule. There is 1 week of overnight shifts. There are daily teaching and educational activities as well as regular conferences to expand the student’s clinical knowledge base and enhance the sub-internship experience. These include daily presentation rounds, ongoing radiology rounds, specialty rounds, morbidity and mortality conferences, psychosocial rounds, and Grand Rounds.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:

Students will receive ongoing feedback as well as formal feedback midway and at the end of the rotation. Teaching attending physicians and senior residents contributes to the final evaluation.

Maria Teresa Santos, MD
maria.santos@einsteinmed.edu
Purnima Garg, MD
pgarg@montefiore.org
718-430-2900 (2757)
Administrative support: Ms. Adriana Nieto
Adriana.nieto@einsteinmed.edu
718-430-2213
Maximum: 1
Blocks: All except Block 7 (Availability is limited)

On the first day students report to Montefiore Medical Center – Moses Campus, Unit NW7, 111 E 210th St, Bronx, NY 10467) at 7 AM.

 

FM520 Research-Based Health Activism

(Einstein/Montefiore Medical Center)

** NOT OFFERED DURING 2022 – 2023 ACADEMIC YEAR**

This four week elective will offer motivated 4th year medical students an opportunity to develop skills and knowledge in research methods, health policy, and advocacy. Learning experiences range from seminars with leading health policy experts to skill-building workshops with health care activists. Each student is expected to develop a research proposal and advocacy plan that addresses a health care issue of his or her choosing. Following the course, projects are completed in the remaining academic year with ongoing mentorship.

Learning Objectives:
Following completion of this course, learners will be able to:

1. Describe the concept of Research Based Health Activism
2. Develop a feasible research question to better understand health disparities in their communities
3. List ways that physicians participate in advocacy for individual patients, within health systems, and at a policy level
4. Utilize multiple advocacy skills: public speaking, writing op-eds, meeting with legislators

Evaluation:

Students will receive formal feedback at the midpoint and end of the elective. Evaluation will be based on attendance, effort during seminars, completion of weekly assignments, and presentation of project proposal.

Typical Schedule:

Morning and afternoon seminars running from 9am – 5pm. Thursdays are free for project development, home work assignments, and one-on-one mentorship. There is no clinical duty or call schedule.

Textbook Information: (Suggested)
Hulley, SB, Cummings SR, Browner WS, Grady D, Hearst N, Newman TB. Designing Clinical Research (2nd Edition). Philadephia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2001.
ISBN: 9781608318049
Cost: $75.99

Musaub Khan, MD
mkhan6@montefiore.org
718-920-7173
Maximum Students: 15
Module: 3B Only October 15 – November 9, 2018 (course offered annually)

On the first day students report to Division of General Internal Medicine (3300 Kossuth Ave, Bronx, NY 10467)

 

FM528 Palliative Care

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**Einstein students must contact Dr. Eti for approval prior to registration**

The purpose of this elective is to introduce fourth-year medical students to the philosophy, principles, and practice of Palliative Care.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:

  • Learn how to assess pain and non-pain symptoms.
  • Observe palliative care assessment and management provided across settings.
  • Recognize the role of the interdisciplinary team in the delivery of hospice and palliative care.
  • Describe how to assess and communicate prognosis.
  • Describe the use of opioids in pain and non-pain symptom management during serious illness.
  • Describe the use of non-opioid analgesics, adjuvant analgesics, and other pharmacologic approaches to the management of both pain and non-pain symptoms.
  • Recognize common social problems experienced by patients and families facing life-threatening conditions and describe appropriate clinical assessment and management.

Learning experience:

  • Participation in the daily morning rounds
  • Participation in weekly interdisciplinary team meetings, monthly grand rounds, journal clubs or case conferences.
  • Participation in Interdisciplinary meeting
  • Participation in Teaching activities with fellows
  • One week rotation in the Palliative Care-Hospice Unit – optional

Method of student feedback and evaluation:

  • Introductory lecture and review of objectives
  • Pre and post evaluation
  • Formal feedback by the supervising physician

Serife Eti, MD
seti@montefiore.org
718-920-6378
Maximum: 2
Blocks: TBD

On the first day students report to 3347 Steuben Ave Bronx, NY at 8:30 am

 

FM531 Care of Latino Patients and Communities

(Family Health Center (FHC)-Montefiore Medical Center)

The Department of Family and Social Medicine/Albert Einstein College of Medicine is committed to providing culturally competent care to underserved communities. This advanced elective offers 4th-year medical students the opportunity to serve and learn about the Latino patient and population within the Bronx in an outpatient setting. This elective will provide exposure to a wide range of unique aspects of the care of Latino patients and communities including clinical and social determinants of health. The student(s) will also gain knowledge and skills with particular emphasis on the patient-doctor interactions, clinical diagnosis, management, and community partnerships and resources. In addition, the student will have the opportunity to refine their
cultural and communication (e.g. Medical Spanish) competencies. The rotation will take place at the Family Health Center (FHC), an academic family medicine federally qualified health center (FQHC) that offers a range of clinical care models including but not limited to Centering Pregnancy, HIV care, Teen health, group medical visits, among others. FHC serves Latino communities from Central America (Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Panama), the Caribbean (mainly Puerto Rican and the Dominican Republic), and Mexico.

One important and required component of this rotation is that the student will engage in scholarly activities that focus on addressing issues affecting the care of Latino patients and communities including healthcare disparities, barriers to access to healthcare, immigrant populations, and medically underserved communities. The students can tailor their clinical experience and scholarly project to their interests.

Objectives:

By the completion of the elective the student(s)… 

  • will be able describe and explain the social determinants of health and barriers for access to care for Latino patients. 
  • can recognize the diversity of Latino culture and communities. 
  • will be able to recognized the impact of socio-cultural factors (e.g., of religion, family units and dynamics, alternative medicine, food) in the health of Latino patients  
  • will recognize specific aspects and dynamic of the patient-doctor interactions that might be unique to the care of Latino patients  
  • will produce a scholarly project focused on health issues affecting Latino communities 
  • will be familiar with community resources available to patients.  

Requirement: 
Advanced Spanish language proficiency

Method of student feedback and evaluation: 

Medical students will receive formal in-person feedback on a weekly basis. Their overall performance will be based on the level of participation and engagement in course activities and scholarly work project progress or completion.

Dr. Juan Robles
jrobles@montefiore.org
917-696-3091
Block: 5
Maximum: 3

On the first day students report to: August 15, 2022 (location) at The Family Health Center, Montefiore Medical Center, 1 Fordham Plaza, Bronx, NY at 8.30 am.

Medicine (MED)

 

K502 Clinical Endocrinology

(Jacobi and Weiler)

**Not Available to International Exchange Students**

The purpose of the elective is to provide clinical experience in out-patient and in-patient Endocrinology accompanied by didactic instruction. The elective is full-time. There are two similar programs, one on the East Campus (K502) and one on the West campus (K516). The outpatient component is the same in both electives. The in-patient consultation service is similar but at different locations. The student will function as a member of the Department of Medicine Endocrinology Consultative Team, including medical residents and endocrinology fellows, to provide service to inpatients at one of two sites:

1. Jacobi Medical Center and MMC-Weiler (K502) or

2. Moses Division of Montefiore and North Central Bronx Hospital (K516). Work rounds are held daily, and attending rounds occur daily – generally three times weekly. The student will have the opportunity to participate in the following clinics:

1. Monday Morning- CFCC Diabetes and Endocrinology Clinic;

2. Tuesday Afternoon- Jacobi Endocrinology Clinic;

3. Thursday Morning- Montefiore Diabetes clinic;

4. Friday Afternoon- Montefiore Endocrine Clinic. The student will have the opportunity to attend the following conferences:

1. Monday AM- Multidisciplinary Diabetes Conference (preceding CFCC Clinic);

2. Wednesday Afternoon- Endocrinology Fellows Conference (at Moses);

3. Thursday Morning- Diabetes Journal Club (preceding Montefiore Diabetes Clinic);

4. Friday Morning- Clinical Endocrinology Grand Rounds followed by Diabetes Research Center Conference. It is expected that the student will develop familiarity with endocrine evaluation and pathophysiology in a variety of endocrine disorder diseases. Emphasis on basic physiological concepts as related to endocrine disorders is stressed.

General description and goals of elective:

Student is expected to follow the endocrine fellow, attending the same activities, including in-patient and out-patient consults, rounds, and conferences. The goal is to learn a general understanding of endocrine evaluation and testing, and pathophysiology of a variety of endocrine disorders and diseases.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:

Direct feedback from Attending and Fellow.

Jill Crandall, MD
Contact: Maritza Reyes, Program Supervisor, marreyes@montefiore.org, 718-920-2017
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2

On the first day students report to: contact Endocrine Fellow

K503A Dermatology

(Montefiore Medical Center)

Four week elective (only) during which third and fourth year students will have a wide range of clinical and didactic experiences. Students will be assigned to one of our five resident clinic sites 7-8 half days a week (Montefiore Medical Center (MMC), Wakefield Division (MMC), Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, North Central Bronx Hospital, and Jacobi Medical Center). There selected opportunities to work with residents on our inpatient consultation services, ‘shadow’ in our faculty practice, and observe cosmetic and dermatological surgery. The elective also includes two half days a week of varied didactics, including weekly Grand Rounds, Morning Report, Basic Science, Dermatopathology, Journal Club, Textbook Review, Clinical Slides Conference, and lectures.

Ranon Mann, MD
RMANN@montefiore.org
Contact: Karen Grant, kagrant@montefiore.org
Blocks: All (please do not sign up for this module if you have more than 3 interviews scheduled during your rotation)
Maximum: 6

On the first day students report to: 3411 Wayne Avenue, 2nd Floor, Suite D, Bronx, NY 10467 at 7:30AM

 

K503B Dermatology Preceptorship

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses)

Fourth year medical student elective; requisite 4-week rotation.

Students will work primarily with either Dr. Steven Cohen or other core academic faculty four-full days of the week in conjunction with two half-days of attending resident didactics. The clinical service features complex medical and pediatric dermatology, as well as dedicated sessions for hidradenitis suppurativa. Presentation of live cases at Dermatology Grand Rounds and other didactic sessions are encouraged. The elective incorporates participation in all teaching conferences, including Grand Rounds, Morning Report, Basic Science, Dermatopathology, Journal Club, Textbook Review, Clinical Slides Conference, and lectures.

Steven R. Cohen, MD
Contact: Karen Grant, kagrant@montefiore.org , (718) 920-2680
Blocks: All
Maximum: Einstein students only during blocks 2-5; 1 student during blocks 6-14

On the first day students report to: 1250 Waters Place, 6th Floor, Suite D, Bronx, NY 10467 at 8:30AM. Schedule is subject to change and must be confirmed with Karen Grant one week prior to start date.

K504 Rheumatology

(Montefiore/Jacobi )

This is a highly valuable elective with a very strong education component for anyone interested in internal medicine since many of the rheumatic diseases are multi-systemic. Students will have the opportunity to learn the procedure skill of arthrocentesis in addition to improving their MSK exam skills while evaluating patients at either Moses, Weiler or Jacobi hospital depending on availability. Hospital patients are evaluated under the supervision of the Rheumatology fellow and attending currently rotating on the inpatient service and medical students will present patients, discuss management and while reading and presenting the relevant literature.

Students will attend clinic in the morning at Jacobi or Moses, Monday through Thursday and weekly Journal Club and Grand Rounds on Fridays. Inpatient rounds scheduling will be variable depending on the Attending but typically are at least three times per week in the afternoon.

Learning objectives and assessment:

Medical Knowledge: The student will have gained medical knowledge in the field of Rheumatology and be able to evaluate and treat common Rheumatologic conditions. Gain knowledge in interpretation of common Rheumatologic laboratory tests and imaging. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty (Attending and Fellows) Assessment.

Patient care: Demonstrate the ability to gather information from a patient with a Rheumatologic condition and do a thorough Rheumatologic examination of joints and other appropriate areas. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Bedside Observation. The student will be able to interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and radiologic studies and come up with a differential diagnosis and treatment plan for Rheumatology patients. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Faculty Bedside Observation.

Practice-Based Learning and Improvement: Learned to use local resources to research issues and read regarding their Rheumatologic patient as an independent adult learner. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Global Peer Assessment.

Interpersonal and Communication Skills: Communicate clearly, compassionately, and effectively with patients and their families regarding Rheumatologic conditions. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Faculty Bedside Observation. Communicate clearly, and effectively both in written and verbal form with other clinicians and health care personnel regarding Rheumatologic patients. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Faculty Bedside Observation.

 

ProfessionalismThe student will demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity and honesty with regard to patient care and maintain patient confidentiality when consulting on a Rheumatologic patient. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Faculty Bedside Observation. Demonstrate a commitment to carrying out professional responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding patients with Rheumatologic diseases. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment.

Systems Based Practice: The student will interact with the primary physician team, consulting attending, and allied health care personnel as part of a health care team. Learn to help the patient navigate the healthcare system to obtain needed aide and care for those with Rheumatologic conditions. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment.

Supervision: The resident on Rheumatology elective is supervised by the Rheumatology attending and fellow on consults that month.

Learning experience:

  • Participation in outpatient and inpatient evaluations
  • Perform focused musculoskeletal history and physical exam
  • Participate in patient care and Attending Rounds
  • Interpret laboratory results and basic imaging pertinent to MSK Medicine
  • Attempt to perform the procedure skill of arthrocentesis and joint injection.Students are responsible to work with the Rheumatology fellow to see inpatient consults and present them on attending rounds that day. There are teaching rounds at least three times per week with the fellow and attending during which the resident presents new consults and follow-ups on previously seen patients. The student should be prepared to discuss the differential diagnosis and pertinent medical literature.The residents will participate in weekly educational and clinic activities:

Monday AM Jacobi Joint Pain Clinic Building 8:30AM, 4A
Tues AM Lupus Clinic at 8:30 AM MMC
Wed AM- Rheumatology Clinic, 8:30AM MMC
Thurs AM- Jacobi Rheumatology Clinic Building 8:30AM, 4B
Friday 8AM-10AM Journal Club and Grand Rounds, AECOM

Resources:
-American College of Rheumatology on-line Educational Resources http://www.rheumatology.org/education/resources/index.asp
-Up-To-Date for topic review
-AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
-Kelly’s Textbook of Rheumatology available through the Einstein Library

Konstantinos Loupasakis, MD
kloupasaki@montefiore.org
Administrative support: Itzamarie Ayala, itayala@montefiore.org, 718-920-6682
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2

Students must contact Ms. Itzamarie Ayala one week before the rotation for meeting location and time

K506 Infectious Diseases

(Montefiore Medical Center – Weiler)

**Einstein students must contact the elective director, Dr. Nori, for approval prior to registration**

Adult patients with probable bacterial, viral, mycotic, parasitic, or rickettsial diseases are evaluated and presented on rounds daily to the infectious disease fellow and attending physician for differential diagnosis, recommendations for basic and advanced microbiologic testing, therapeutic options, and discussion. Basic techniques of clinical microbiology learned during the second-year course in Microbiology and Infectious Diseases are reviewed with particular reference to the patients seen. Students also attend seminars and combined Pediatric-Medicine Infectious Disease Grand Rounds. A highly useful elective no matter what field a student is considering for a career because nearly all types of physicians see patients with infections and use antibiotics. Faculty: see Einstein ID faculty website.

Rachel Bartash, MD
rbartash@montefiore.org
Contact: Ms. Ana Capellan
acapella@montefiore.org,
718-920-5438
Blocks: All
Maximum: No maximum, students rotating at the same time can be distributed to different teams and different locations

Students should contact Ms. Ana Capellan a few days in advance to be connected to the right team and to receive instructions on where to report on day 1. They will also receive Grand Rounds and core curriculum lecture schedule by e-mail. 

 

K509 Clinical Nephrology

(Montefiore Medical Center – Weiler and Moses)

Students participate as an active team member in the work-up, management and treatment of hospitalized and ambulatory patients with renal disease, high blood pressure, electrolytes and acid base disorders, and renal transplant. Students will recognize the significance of renal dysfunction to the morbidity faced by patients living with these diseases. Students will recognize renal emergencies and be able to explain the indications and potential complications of treatments used for patients with renal diseases.

Rotation Breakdown

  • Einstein (Weiler) Inpatient Nephrology Consult– 2 weeks
  • Moses Silver Service (Inpatient Nephrology Consult)– 1 week
  • Moses Transplant Service- 1 week
  • Visit to Monte 4 outpatient dialysis unit: half a day
  • Two Weeks Elective: A two-weeks elective is also available upon request. You will spend 1 week at Weiler doing inpatient nephrology consults and 1 week at Moses in the transplant service. However, you may request to substitute the week of transplant for an additional week of general nephrology consult at Weiler or Moses if you so desire.

Learning objectives:

  • Perform and record complete history and physical exams including differential diagnosis, assessments, and plan for patients with kidney problems.
    • Interpret laboratory tests, medical imaging and diagnostic studies employed in the assessment of renal function.
    • Identify the signs, symptoms, and management of common renal syndromes including acute kidney injury and chronic renal failure.
    • Analyze urinary sediment and be able to identify cells, casts, and crystals during the evaluation of patients with acute kidney injury.
    • Recognize urgent and emergent indications for hemodialysis.
    • Discuss the diagnosis and management of fluid, electrolyte and acid-base disorders.
    • Summarize the diagnosis and management of primary and secondary hypertension.
    • Describe the principles related to the use of phosphate binders, vitamin D supplements and calcimimetic drugs for treatment of bone mineral disease and hyperparathyroidism.
    • Explain transplant eligibility criteria, evaluation, and inpatient management of transplant patients.
    • Review the mechanism of action and management of immunosuppression medications.

Teaching Methods

  1. Supervised Direct Patient Care
  2. Independent Reading
  3. Didactic Lectures:
    • Case discussions with fellows and attendings will occur during rounds.
    • You are also required to attend weekly Grand Rounds and Journal Clubs as well as the weekly fellows’ clinical conference.
    • In addition to the above required lectures, while in transplant, you are required to attend the transplant lectures/meetings.
    • You will meet once a week with the directors of the nephrology elective (Dr. Azzi and Dr. Liriano-Ward) to discuss an interesting case of your choice seen during the rotation.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: The nephrology attending will provide immediate feedback at points during and after the rotation verbally to the student, and complete the written evaluation provided by AECOM.

Textbook(s) information:
Koeppen and Stanton, Renal Physiology, 2018 (6th edition)
Rose and Post, Clinical Physiology of Acid-Base and Electrolyte Disorders, 5th edition
Johnson, Feehally and Floege, Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology, 6th edition

Luz Liriano-Ward, MD
lliriano@montefiore.org
718-828-6840
Blocks: All
Maximum: 4

Prior to starting the elective, Dr. Liriano-Ward will give you a brief orientation to the elective and inform you where to report on your first day. 

 

K511A – Cardiology

(Jacobi Medical Center/Weiler Hospital)

A closely supervised experience with clinical and laboratory methods currently employed in the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiac disease of diverse etiology. Participation is expected in daily attending consultation rounds, the CCU, a weekly cardiology specialty clinic and conferences. This also provides an introduction to cardiac catheterization, angiography, pacing, and bedside monitoring. Major time is spent interpreting EKGs and arrhythmias with close faculty interaction.

Jincy Thankachen, MD
thankacj@nychhc.org
Contact: Ms. Kathy Varga, kathy.varga@nbhn.net
Blocks: All
Maximum: 6 students

First day student meet Room 5E2 – Jacobi Medical Center at 9:00 A.M.

 

K512 Unified Gastroenterology/Liver Disease-East Campus

(Jacobi Medical Center)

At both sites, students participate in all departmental functions under the direct supervision of a Gastroenterology Fellow and Attending. The student examines patients in the clinic and hospital and discusses patients with both Fellows and assigned attending physicians. Students participate in 16-20 hours of rounds and conferences per week including Research Seminars, GI-Pathology review, GI Radiology review, Journal Club, and Grand Rounds. Students are encouraged to attend and participate in all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on their patients including diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopies (gastroscopy, ERCP, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy), esophageal motility studies, and liver biopsies.

Douglas Simon, MD
718-918-5907
doug.simon@nychhc.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 3

First day meeting location and time: G.I. Office, 2nd Floor, Endoscopy Suite, Jacobi Medical Center at 9:00 AM

K513 Renal

(Jacobi Medical Center)

**Einstein students must contact Dr. Acharya for approval prior to registration**

The goal of this rotation is to learn to evaluate and treat common kidney diseases. It includes history and physical examination, ordering and analyzing laboratory and radiological data, and formulating treatment strategies.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:
-Take history and physical exam which is problem oriented
-Come up with differential diagnosis of the disease condition
-Supervised decision making related to treatment and management, including indications for a renal biopsy
-Perform urine analysis, dipstick and microscopy, and be able to identify common urine abnormalities in form of cellular casts, crystals, dysmorphic red cells and proteinuria

Learning experience: The location of the elective will be at Jacobi Medical Center where the student will be expected to present patients during teaching rounds and to participate in the critical discussion of patients on the renal service. They will be introduced to the interpretation of renal biopsies. This rotation emphasizes didactic teaching and practical management of renal patients in an academically nurturing environment. Students will report to the renal fellow each morning and will be assigned new cases. They will follow the renal division schedule while on the rotation. The student will need prior approval from the division chief and the elective is open to visiting medical students at Einstein

Method of student feedback and evaluation: The nephrology attending will provide feedback during and after the rotation verbally to the student, and complete the written evaluation.

Textbook(s) information (Suggested)

ISBN 0-07-134682-1
Title: Clinical Physiology of acid-base and electrolyte disorders
Edition: 5th or later
Author: Burton Rose, Theodore Post

Anjali Acharya, MD
anjali.acharya@nychhc.org
718-918-7901
Administrative support: Eduardo Naranjo, eduardo.naranjo@nychhc.org, 718-918-3176
Blocks: All except 1- 5
Maximum: 2

On the first day students report to: 6E-19 Building I, Jacobi at 8.30 am

 

K515 Unified Gastroenterology/Liver Disease-West Campus

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses and NCB)

At both sites, students participate in all departmental functions under the direct supervision of a Gastroenterology Fellow and Attending. The student examines patients in the clinic and hospital and discusses patients with both Fellows and assigned attending physicians. Students participate in 16-20 hours of rounds and conferences per week including Research Seminars, GI-Pathology review, GI Radiology review, Journal Club, and Grand Rounds. Students are encouraged to attend and participate in all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on their patients including diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopies (gastroscopy, ERCP, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy), esophageal motility studies, and liver biopsies.

Thomas Ullman, MD
tullman@montefiore.org
Daniel Behin, MD
dbehin@montefiore.org
Administrative Support: Rosalyn Andrews, rbarnes@montefiore.org, 718-920-4154
Blocks: All
Maximum: 3

On the first day students report to GI Endoscopy Suite – Red Zone Montefiore Hospital at 7:45 AM

 

K516 Clinical Endocrinology

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses)

**Not Available to International Exchange Students**

The purpose of the elective is to provide clinical experience in-patient and out-patient Endocrinology accompanied by didactic instruction. The elective is full-time. There are two similar programs, one on the East Campus (K502) and one on the West campus (K516). The outpatient component is the same in both electives. The in-patient consultation service is similar but at different locations. The student will function as a member of the Department of Medicine Endocrinology Consultative Team, including medical residents and endocrinology fellows, to provide service to inpatients at one of two sites:

1) Jacobi Medical Center and Weiler Hospital or

2) Moses Division of Montefiore and North Central Bronx Hospital. Work rounds are held daily, and attending rounds occur generally three times weekly. The student will have the opportunity to participate in the following clinics:

1. Monday Morning- CFCC Diabetes and Endocrinology Clinic;

2. Tuesday Afternoon- Jacobi Endocrinology Clinic;

3. Wednesday Morning- Reproductive Endocrinology Clinic;

4. Thursday Morning- Montefiore Diabetes clinic;

5. Friday Afternoon- Montefiore Endocrine Clinic. The student will have the opportunity to attend the following conferences:

1. Monday AM- Multidisciplinary Diabetes Conference (preceding CFCC Clinic);

2. Wednesday Afternoon- Endocrinology Fellows Conference (at Moses);

3. Thursday Morning- Diabetes Journal Club (preceding Montefiore Diabetes Clinic);

4. Friday Morning- Clinical Endocrinology Grand Rounds followed by Diabetes Research Center Conference. It is expected that the student will develop familiarity with endocrine evaluation and a variety of endocrine diseases. Emphasis on basic physiological concepts as related to endocrine disorders is stressed.

For further information, contact
Textbook Information: (Suggested)Williams Textbook of Endocrinology, 14th EditionISBN: 9780323297387Cost: $229.99Author: Shlomo Melmed et al

Noah Bloomgarden, MD
Nbloomga@montefiore.org
Contact: Ms. Maritza Reyes, Program Supervisor, marreyes@montefiore.org,718-920-7923
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2

On the first day student report to: Endocrine fellow on inpatient services in the respective campus.

 

K517 Cardiology

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses)

As part of the selected elective at Montefiore Einstein Center for Heart and Vascular Care the student is to report to the Cardiology Administrative Office, at 7:30am, located at the Foreman Pavilion, Silver Zone, at 111 East 210th Street. There he/she will meet the on-call fellow – who will be the mentor for the duration of the elective. As part of the Cardiology Elective Program, the student will be given an introduction to cardiology, emphasizing various aspects such as: physical examination, clinical evaluation and therapy, EKG sessions, as well as reviews of cardiac catheterization and echocardiograph studies. He/she will participate on morning activities in the fellow’s Conference room, and other activities such as Cardiology Grand Rounds. The student will also be provided temporary computer access (a form will be provided for access a few weeks before the elective is set to begin).

Textbook Information: (Suggested)
The Only EKG Book you will Ever Need by Malcolm Thaler

Carlos Gongora, MD
cgongora1@montefiore.org
Contact: Gicenia DeLeon-Lam, gdeleonl@montefiore.org, 718-904-2471
Blocks: All except blocks1, 3-5
Maximum: 2

 

K518 Diabetes: Blood Sugar Normalization & Rehabilitation of the Whole Patient

(Mamaroneck, NY)

NOT OFFERED DURING 2022-2023 ACADEMIC YEAR

**Einstein students must contact the elective director Samantha for approval prior to registration**

Students will participate in a private medical practice devoted exclusively to the treatment of diabetes and its complications. Patients of ages greater than 10 years will be seen. Participants will be trained in the most advanced methods for outpatient blood sugar normalization and weight control, as well as demonstrations of how to reverse diabetic complications. Topics to be covered include patient training, intensive physical examination geared toward tracking diabetic complications, routine and research level laboratory studies, special diagnostic equipment, diet, self-monitoring of blood glucose, modern exercise training, intensive insulin therapy, selection and use of oral agents, the use of new agents and psychological techniques to curb overeating and carbohydrate craving. Diagnosis and treatment of the following diabetic complications will be covered in depth: gastrointestinal motility disorders, autonomic neuropathies, peripheral vascular disease, Moenckeberg’s Atherosclerosis, new cardiac risk factors, foot ulcers, nephropathy, hypertension, ophthalmologic problems, musculoskeletal complications, and erectile dysfunction. Also covered will be diabetes associated diseases such as hypothyroidism, psoriasis snd the newly discovered association with Common Variable Immune Deficiency.

The preceptor of this course (Dr.Bernstein) has had type 1 diabetes for more than 75 years. During his prior career as an engineer, he reversed his diabetic sequelae, including advanced glomerular nephropathy. This was accomplished by violating dogmatic treatment guidelines that still advocate high blood sugars, high carbohydrate diets, and industrial doses of insulin. His “common sense” methods appear in the text cited below and on his internet series “Dr.Bernstein’s Diabetes University”, freely available via “YOUTUBE” or “GOOGLE”.

Needlestick precautions not necessary as bloods are drawn elsewhere.

MODULES – All modules in 2023, sooner if COVID conditions permit.

Required textbook:

DIABETES SOLUTION, by Richard K. Bernstein, MD
ISBN: 987-0-316-18269-0
Edition: 2011
Cost: $25.21 from <amazon.com>, $15.99 in Kindle format.

Richard K. Bernstein, MD
914-698-7525
md@diabetesscientist.com
Elective Director: Samantha Flynn, samflynn@diabetesscientist.com, 914-698-7500
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2 students per block

Students must provide their own transportation to Mamaroneck, New York (15 miles north of AECOM). Buses run from the Bronx and trains from Fordham Station. First day of elective, meet at 10:00 a.m. – 1160 Greacen Point Road -Mamaroneck, New York 10543 (maps and transportation details are available from preceptor)

 

K519 Cardiology

(Montefiore Medical Center – Wakefield)

The Cardiology rotation will provide the student with experience in the evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular problems. This rotation will emphasize the approach to diagnosis and management of acute and chronic cardiac diseases, as well as management of risk factors for disease. In addition, the rotation will emphasize the practice of primary care cardiology in medically underserved environment. Learning goals focus on complete and accurate history and cardiovascular examination, ECG interpretation, indications for various invasive and noninvasive diagnostic studies, and understanding of first line medical therapy for common cardiac diseases. This will provide them the opportunity to transition from didactic to integrated clinical evaluation and patient management.

At the end of the rotation the medical students should be able to: Obtain complete and accurate history pertinent to the differential diagnosis. Complete a pertinent physical examination for the evaluation of cardiovascular system distress and pertinent to the differential diagnosis. Distinguish normal from abnormal cardiovascular signs and symptoms. Formulating a differential diagnosis based on the findings from the history and physical examination. Describe information resources for determining diagnostic options for patients with cardiac problems. Demonstrate knowledge of the criteria for diagnosis of common cardiology problems. Approach ECG interpretation in a systematic and logical fashion. Demonstrate ability to evaluate and manage patients with the following conditions: Stable coronary syndromes, Cardiac dysrhythmias, Congestive heart failure, and Hypertension. Know about common critical cardiac conditions. Recognize unstable patients in need of urgent evaluation and management. Know the first-line therapies for most common cardiac conditions. Recognize gaps in own knowledge; be self-directed at reading on those issues and initiating discussion of those topics with the team. Demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Cardiology Consult care team, patients and families. Provide compassionate and empathic patient care and be sensitive to the diverse factors affecting patients and their health care beliefs and needs including race, culture, income and ethnicity.

Basic structure of the day is to start with cardiology teaching sessions in the morning. Medical students are expected to attend Cardiology Teaching Conferences including cardiology grand rounds, journal clubs, morning reports, cardiology subspecialty lectures, etc every day 7:30-8:30 in one of Albert Einstein medical campuses. The day following by visiting admitted patients, writing notes on them and meeting the teaching attending later in the day to discuss the cases with. The teaching attending will then round at the bedside with the team on each of these patients. The remainder of the day is spent performing new consultations, as assigned by the resident of attending. Students will have the opportunity to read and interpret ECGs. In addition, students will be able to observe standard exercises stress testing, exercise stress imaging studies or pharmacologic stress testing, echocardiography.

The student is encouraged to feedback on a daily basis, but especially at the mid-point of the rotation by the cardiology attending. This will be an opportunity to address any issues from the student’s perspective. Upon completion of the rotation, the student will receive a written evaluation in accordance with the medical school policy. This will be completed by the teaching attending responsible to oversee the clinical aspects of the rotation after discussion with any other attending, resident and cardiology fellow who worked directly with the student.

Richard Lucariello, MD
rilucari@montefiore.org
718-920-9256
Blocks: All
Maximum: 4

First day of the rotation student should report to the Department of Cardiology at 9 AM

 

K520 Hematology

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses and Weiler )

The goal of this elective is to teach students the basic hematology that is essential to all aspects of medicine. Students are assigned to the Consult Service at Montefiore and will see hospital consults with the Hematology Fellows and Consult Attending. In addition to daily Attending Rounds, students will attend two Hematology Clinics each week, a case-based thrombosis conference and red cell conference, morphology review of both bone marrows and blood smears, and weekly teaching conferences with the Attendings. There is an 8 am teaching conference every morning of the week, with the exception of Fridays – 1st conference begins at 7:30am.

Ellen Friedman, MD
elfriedm@montefiore.org
Contacts: Mrs. Tawana Villalba, taalvare@montefiore.org & Harry Rosado, hrosado@montefiore.org
718-920-4137
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

First day of elective students will meet at Montefiore Medical Center – Moses Campus, 3411 Wayne Avenue, ground Floor, Suite A, 8:00 AM.

 

K523 Pulmonary Medicine

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses)

The goal of this medical student elective is to introduce advanced medical student to the fundamentals of Pulmonary Medicine. Students are assigned to a very busy consult service at Montefiore/Moses and Weiler division and will see hospital consults with Pulmonary Fellows and Consults Attending. In addition to daily Attending Rounds, students will attend weekly Pulmonary Clinics and multiple interdisciplinary conferences addressing diseases of the chest, including joint conferences with radiology, pathology, oncology, and thoracic surgery. Pulmonary physiology, including performing and interpreting pulmonary function studies measuring mechanics, volumes, gas transfer and exchange, and their use in disease diagnosis and management, will be part of the rotation. Exposure to regulation of Ventilation/Sleep Medicine is integral to the rotation. Students will also have the opportunity to observe and assist in Pulmonary Medicine procedures, including thoracentesis, fiberoptic bronchoscopy, and related endo- and trans-bronchial procedures.

Divya Reddy, MD
dreddy@montefiore.org
718-920-6054
Contact: Ms. Lynette Bradberry, lbradber@montefiore.org, 718-920-6054
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2

On the first day students report to: assigned site (Weiler or Moses) campus at 8:00 AM.

K524 Infectious Diseases

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses)

Adult patients with probable bacterial, viral, fungal, parasitic, or rickettsial diseases are evaluated and presented on rounds daily to the infectious disease fellow and attending physician for differential diagnosis, recommendations for basic and advanced microbiologic testing, therapeutic options, and discussion. Basic techniques of clinical microbiology learned during the second year course in Microbiology and Infectious Diseases are reviewed with particular reference to the patients seen. Students also attend seminars and combined Pediatric-Medicine Infectious Disease Grand Rounds. A highly useful elective no matter what field a student is considering for a career because nearly all types of physicians see patients with infections and use antibiotics. Faculty: Drs. P. Alpert, J. Brust, J. Chan, U. Felsen R. Grossberg, R. Khedimi, I. Leviton, G. Minamoto, V. Muggia, B. Ostrowsky, P. Nori, C. Park, Y. Puius, P. Riska, N. Robbins, M. Slosar-Cheah, J. Shuter, B. Zingman

Rachel Bartash, MD
rbartash@montefiore.org
Contact: Ms. Ana Capella
acapella@montefiore.org,
718-920-5438
Modules: All
Maximum: 2

On the first day student should report to 3411 Wayne Avenue, Suite 4H at 8:30 A.M. Students should contact Ms. Angie Vega at least one day in advance to make sure that the fellows will be available at these times and to get the Grand Rounds and core curriculum lecture schedule by e-mail.

K526 Allergy & Immunology

(Jacobi Medical Center/MMC-Moses and Weiler)

A clinical or combined clinical/research elective designed to teach the student the fundamentals of diagnosis, management and research methods in allergy and immunology. Students will directly participate in the care of patients in all of the hospital clinics and faculty practice locations of the Allergy Division and be exposed to a complete range of allergic and immunologic disorders. The rotation includes time in the drug desensitization program, food allergy center and severe asthma center. Typical research projects include etiology and treatment of chronic urticaria, asthma, sinusitis, drug and food allergies. The elective can be customized to the needs and wishes of individual students. If you are planning to use the elective for research we strongly recommend contacting your mentor a few months in advance to decide your project and complete necessary formalities such as IRB applications.The rotation will include participation in the Adult Allergy Journal Club on Wednesdays and Combined Allergy Division Friday conferences.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:

  • Learn the fundamental principles of Allergy/Immunology diagnosis.
  • Learn how to treat asthma and allergic disorders.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Oral and written.

Suggested Textbook: “Middleton’s Allergy Essentials, 1st ed. / O’Hehir, Robyn E. 2017” which is available at no cost online through the AECOM library

Manish Ramesh, MD
mramesh@montefiore.org
Modules: All
Maximum: 4

For students coming to Montefiore/ Einstein on an away elective: The student should contact Whitley Carter (wcarter@montefiore.org) and cc Madeline Solis (msolis@montefiore.org) and Manish Ramesh (mramesh@montefiore.org) as soon as the elective request is approved. This is to ensure that we can help facilitate ID and computer access requirements in time for the rotation.

Student should come to Hutchinson Metro Center TowerII 12th Fl Allergy, 1250 Waters Pl, Bronx NY by 8:30 am on the first day of their rotation. They should email Whitley Carter (wcarter@montefiore.org) to obtain the rotation schedule 

K529 Pulmonary

(Montefiore Medical Center – Weiler)

This elective is based at the Weiler division of Montefiore Medical Center. The focus is on learning to provide consultation and continued care to patients with pulmonary problems in the inpatient and outpatient settings. The student will also participate in interpreting pulmonary function studies and conferences. There is the opportunity to observe and participate in procedures.

Jay Dobkin, MD
jdobkin@montefiore.org
718-904-2983 or 866-633-8255
Modules: All
Maximum: 1 student

On the first day of elective, the student is requested to come to the pulmonary office at Weiler – 2 South Room 28 at 9:00 A.M.

 

K546 Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine

(Jacobi Medical Center)

Students who choose this elective will see patients on the Chest Medicine service, Pulmonary Consultation service, Critical Care Medicine Consultation service, and the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Jacobi Medical Center. This is an opportunity to learn about in-depth various Pulmonary and Critical Care problems that present both classically or unusually. On the Chest Medicine Service or MICU, students will join the team for Attending rounds in the morning. Radiology conference takes place three times each week at 11am where the imaging is reviewed with a Radiology attending and resident. On the Consultation services, students will see patients either independently or with the PCCM fellows and Internal Medicine resident(s) who may be taking the elective as well. The Consult Attending will round during different times of the day depending on the acuity of the patients. Chest Clinic takes place Wednesday afternoons and Friday mornings where fellows and Attendings see their follow-ups or new patients referred by Primary Care, other specialties, or the ED. Students may see OPD patients independently or in conjunction with a fellow or Attending. Students will be expected to attend any Divisional Conferences being given during their time on the elective. Pulmonary Function Tests will be interpreted with the fellow or Attending. Finally, students will have opportunities to observe procedures done by the fellow/resident with Attendings supervising.

Reka Salgunan, MD
Reka.Salgunan@nychhc.org
718-918-4505
Modules: All
Maximum: 1 student

First day report to Bldg # 1, 5N50 at 8:30 am

K608 Critical Care

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses)

The primary purpose of this elective is to provide the senior medical student with a diverse, well-rounded, meaningful, and focused exposure to the field of Critical Care Medicine. The student will be exposed to our Consult Service as part of our “ICU without walls” (providing critical care outside the ICU), and learn how critical care triage decisions are made. They will spend time in our Medical ICU, the classic critical care environment, and get an exciting opportunity to rotate through our non-medical intensive care units: the Surgical ICU, where critically ill neurosurgical and general surgical/liver transplant patients are cared for, as well as the Cardiac Surgical ICU, where patients are cared for after cardiac surgery. Over the course of the month, the co-directors will be providing weekly small group lectures on the following topics: Advanced Cardiac Life Support, shock/multiple organ failure, respiratory failure/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, acid-base issues, mechanical ventilation/ventilator weaning, as well as sedation in the ICU, oxygen delivery equations, and hemodynamic monitoring. In addition, the students will be taught about national critical care patient safety initiatives, such as the Institute for Healthcare Improvement ventilator associated pneumonia bundle, central line bundle, and the surviving sepsis campaign guidelines. Students will be invited to attend our morning report, educational noon conferences for the fellows, and our Critical Care Journal Club (in addition to medicine and surgical grand rounds). Medical students will attend daily work rounds, follow one or two patients closely each week, learn how to present critically ill patients on rounds, perform relevant literature searches, and learn fundamental cardiovascular and pulmonary pathophysiology as it relates to the critically ill or injured patient. They will also learn the indications for and techniques of various procedures in the ICU. By the end of the elective, medical students should have developed a broader perspective on what it means to manage a critically ill patient, improved their ability to recognize in which patients critical care is most likely to be helpful (and, conversely, when critical care should perhaps not be provided), as well as enhanced their knowledge of end-of-life issues as they relate to the critically ill patient. They should learn about (and temporarily become part of) the multidisciplinary critical care team, and discover the crucial role of that team in providing high-quality critical care. They will learn the challenges and rewards of a career in Critical Care Medicine. Goals of Rotation: Learn a thoughtful and organized approach to ICU patients; Gain experience with interpretation of ICU patient data. Improve their understanding of common ICU problems such as invasive monitoring, mechanical ventilation, sedation, sepsis, ARDS; Enhance their knowledge of the cardiovascular and pulmonary pathophysiology pertinent to the ICU; Learn to write initial orders for mechanical ventilator support and sedation; Learn the rationale for commonly used ICU protocols such as ARDS ventilator management, insulin drips, weaning from ventilatory support, fast-track extubation after cardiac surgery; Become familiar with some of the important clinical trials in critical care medicine, and the impact of evidence-based medicine on current ICU patient management. This will be a 4-week elective, and will be located at the Moses Campus of Montefiore Medical Center. The medical student’s time will be allocated as follows: one week on the Critical Care Consult service working with the consult fellow and attending; one week in the Medical ICU at Moses; one week in the Surgical ICU at Moses; one week in the Cardiac Surgical ICU at Moses. The duration of time that a student spends in each unit may be modified after discussion between the student and one of the course co-directors. The medical students will meet at 8 am on the first day of the elective in the Critical Care Administration area, Gold Zone. Student Evaluations: We will be distributing a pre-test at the beginning of the course, and a post-test at the end. Please see course description and goals and objectives for more detail as to our expectations. In addition, students will be receiving real-time feedback during the course, as well as exit interviews from one of the course co-directors.

Recommended textbooks:
The ICU Book, 3rd edition, by Paul R. Marino, 2006, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Critical Care Secrets, 4th edition, Parsons/Wiener-Kronish, 2007, Mosby. In addition, students will be provided key critical care references from the past decade or so in the field of critical care medicine. They will also be distributed the Society of Critical Care Medicine “Medical Student’s Guide to Intensive Care Medicine” PDF document.

Matthew Levitus, MD
mlevitus@montefiore.org
Co-Director:
Ashley Miller, MD 
ashmiller@montefiore.org
718-920-5440
Contact: Ms. Ledina Knight
leknight@montefiore.org, 718-904-3015
Modules: All
Maximum: 4

Neurology (NEUR)

 

R501 Pediatric Neurology

(Children’s Hospital at Montefiore/Jacobi Medical Center)

**Not available to International Exchange Students**

Prerequisite: Students must be going into child neurology or adult neurology. Students going into psychiatry will be considered if a slot is available. Students will NOT be considered without this prerequisite.

The student in this elective will work under the supervision of the Pediatric Neurology attending and fellow in both the inpatient and outpatient setting at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, Jacobi Medical Center and will consist of inpatient evaluations, ward rounds, conferences, attendance at consultation, work in neurology clinic and attendance at teaching sessions and seminars.

Learning objectives:

1. To learn to perform the neurological examination in infants and children.

2. To become familiar with the evaluation of pediatric patients with actual or suspected acute neurologic problems, including emergencies, in the pediatric emergency room and in-patient setting.

3. To become familiar with evaluating and treating sub-acute and chronic neurological problems presenting on the inpatient/outpatient pediatric service.

4. To become familiar with neurologic manifestations of general pediatric illnesses.

5. To become familiar with diagnosis and management of pediatric neurologic emergencies, such as status epilepticus, coma, raised intracranial pressure and herniation syndromes, spinal cord compression, meningitis/encephalitis, and severe neuromuscular weakness from acute neuropathies and neuromuscular junction disorders.

6. Approach/Management to hypotonia, febrile seizures, epilepsy, headaches, neurocutaneous syndromes, neuromuscular disorders, etc. (bread and butter pediatric neurology). 7. To learn to present a pediatric neurological history and examination precisely and succinctly.

Learning experience:

1.Participate in consultations from the emergency room, pediatric intensive care unit, neonatal intensive care unit, and pediatric and other services, as directed by the senior Child Neurology Resident.

2. Become familiar with the initial evaluation of patients to be admitted to the Child Neurology and Epilepsy Services.

3. Participate in daily Child Neurology and Epilepsy service rounds, including presenting new patients and discussing active issues on follow-up patients.

4. Become familiar with how to write consultation and follow-up notes.

5. Participate in discussions for each patient consulted on with the primary care team to ensure appropriate coordination of the diagnostic evaluation and treatment plan.

6. Attend all scheduled conferences and clinics.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:

students will receive formal feedback at the end of the rotation. Evaluation will be compiled by the supervising physician.

Textbook information:

Fenichel: Clinical Pediatric Neurology

Nagma Dalvi , MD
718-920-4378
ndalvi@montefiore.org
Modules: All
Maximum: 1

On first day students report to Children’s Hospital at Montefiore 10th floor at Welcome Center at 9AM and page pediatric neurology at 917-457-7461.

Neurosurgery (NEUS)

 

X504 Subinternship in Neurosurgery

(Montefiore Medical Center)

The Subinternship in Neurological Surgery is available to all students who wish an introduction to clinical neurosurgery and participate in the care of patients with neurological diseases requiring surgery. He/She will be closely associated with the Neurosurgical resident staff and join them on ward rounds and in all their educational activities. The evaluation of patients will emphasize the neurological history and examination. The student will have an opportunity to observe or assist all aspects of clinical neurosurgery, and in all divisions, including skull base, brain tumor, cerebrovascular, spine, functional, and pediatrics. The student will be an active participant in the conferences of the Department at Montefiore Medical Center (Moses Division), including tumor board, spine conference, and other resident education activities. It is expected that a “mini-presentation” will be prepared on a subject of interest to the student prior to the end of the module. The Subinternship is particularly designed for those with a serious interest in pursuing further study in Neurological Surgery, Neurology, or for those with career goals in other fields of medicine who would like to gain a more intimate appreciation of Neurological Surgery.

Neil Haranhalli, MD
nharanha@montefiore.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: Unlimited

Please page the neurosurgery resident on call at (917) 956-6986 the day before your rotation starts for specifics on where to meet for rounds on the first day.

Obstetrics/Gynecology (OBGY)

Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology & Women’s Health

The Department offers a variety of electives for students to get an opportunity to be exposed to the breadth and depth of the field of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Women’s Health.

STEPS FOR PROCURING AN OB/GYN ACTING INTERNSHIP OR ELECTIVE:

  • Placements are on a first-come first-served basis.
  • Please note elective locations, as transportation is not provided by Einstein for visiting students.

Visiting Students:
Visiting students can only enroll in one OB/GYN elective, must adhere to Einstein’s set dates, and commit to a 4-week rotation. All visiting students must upload the following into VSAS:

    • USMLE Step 1 score report (only visiting students who have taken USMLE Step 1 can participate in OBGYN electives at Einstein)
    • Medical School Transcript
    • Resume or CV

To apply, please follow the steps as outlined below:

  1. Submit an application in VSAS upon which the Office of the Registrar will determine eligibility
  2. If the student is eligible, the Office of the Registrar (Einstein-MDregistrar@einsteinmed.edu) will make initial placements
  3. The Registrar will contact the OB/GYN Director of Undergraduate Medical Education (UME), Dr. Staci Pollack, the OB/GYN Associate Clerkship & Elective/AI Director, Dr. Said S. Saab, and the OB/GYN Undergraduate Medical Education Administrator, Denise Mabry, for approval and secondary placements
  4. Saab and Ms. Mabry will contact the Elective Director for approval and final placement (it is not necessary to contact the Elective Directors directly, unless directed to do so or stated below).
  5. The Registrar will contact the student with final approval and complete the registration process.
  6. Once students have been notified of their approval, please contact Denise Mabry (dmabry@montefiore.org) for further instructions.

________________________________________________________________________________________

H601W Obstetrics Subinternship (site to TBD by the Department)
H601N Obstetrics Subinternship (site to TBD by the Department)

**this is the same experience as the OBGYN Acting Internship for Einstein students**

General description:
Students participating in this acting internship will have the unique opportunity of becoming an active and integral part of the house staff team on our Labor and Delivery (L&D) Unit as well as our Antepartum and Postpartum units. The student will participate in the management of in-patient obstetrical and high-risk patients, from admission through delivery. The student will be involved in daily rounds and all educational conferences. The student will be an active member of the labor floor team whose responsibilities will be like that of an OBGYN intern.

Measurable learning objectives:

  • Obtain history and physical examinations for antepartum and intrapartum patients
  • Determine intrapartum management of labor (including being able to describe the labor process and interpret fetal monitoring)
  • Perform normal vaginal deliveries
  • Describe indications for and assist in operative deliveries
  • Describe obstetric team functions and safety measures
  • Discuss diagnosis and management of commonly encountered obstetrical problems (preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, preeclampsia, hypertension in pregnancy, etc)

Learning experience:
The student will evaluate and participate in all aspects of patient care from triage through admission, management, and treatment, including delivery when appropriate. The student will participate in daily sign-out/morning report, rounding on antepartum/postpartum patients, and spend most of their time in the L&D Unit. The student will participate in obstetrical ultrasound procedures and lactation consultant rounds. The student will divide their time on both daytime and nighttime shifts. The student will be an integral part of the obstetrical team and attend Statistics Conference, Departmental Grand Rounds, and Resident School (on Tuesdays). The student will make a formal case/topic presentation.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
Mid-clerkship feedback, end-of-clerkship feedback, in-the-moment feedback, FOCE, house staff/attending evaluations, acting internship director written evaluation

Locations, Course Directors, and Administrative Support:

Weiler Hospital                                                                        Wakefield Hospital
Diana Wolfe, MD                                                                      Rodney Wright, MD
dwolfe@montefiore.org                                                         rwright@montefiore.org
718-904-2767                                                                          718-920-9647

Administrative Assistant (Weiler):                                  Administrative Assistant (Wakefield):
Denise Mabry                                                                     Denira Cruz
dmbry@montefiore.org                                                    dencruz@montefiore.org
718-430-2586                                                                     718-920-9647

Blocks: 4-14
Maximum: 2

Report to on day one: If scheduled at Weiler: L&D 6th floor, 7 AM; If scheduled at Wakefield: L&D 3rd floor, 7 AM.

 

H602W GYN Oncology Subinternship

(Weiler Hospital)

This elective will provide an opportunity for the student to participate in the management of gynecologic oncology patients. The student will be exposed to the management of acutely and chronically ill patients with gynecologic malignancies.

Measurable learning objectives:

  • Demonstrate technical skills (venous access, thoracentesis, paracentesis, etc)
  • Describe pre-and post-operative management gynecologic oncology patients
  • Describe basic principles of chemotherapy and radiotherapy
  • Present patients in a variety of settings (tumor board, bedside rounds, etc)
  • Discuss diagnosis and management of commonly encountered gynecologic oncology conditions

Learning experience:
The student will have exposure to different clinical settings and extensive surgical opportunities in the operating room. The student will be expected to participate in all the educational meetings of the division including tumor board, journal club, and case presentations. The student will make a formal presentation at one of these meetings. Didactic and bedside teaching with attendings, fellows, and residents occurs on a daily basis. Interested students are encouraged to participate in the ongoing clinical and/or basic research projects. Previous students have published their research in peer-reviewed journals and presented their data at national meetings. The student will be an integral part of the gynecologic oncology team and attend Statistics Conference, Departmental Grand Rounds, and Resident School (on Tuesdays).

**Visiting Students interested in pursuing a residency spot are given the optional opportunity of taking a weekend call on Labor and Delivery at Weiler Hospital.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
In-the-moment feedback, house staff/attending evaluations, elective director written evaluation

Sara Isani, MD
sisani@montefiore.org
718-405-8082
Blocks: 4-14
Maximum: 1

On the first day report to Weiler Hospital, 11 South at 7:30 AM

 

H603J Benign Gynecology Subinternship

(Jacobi Hospital)

** NOT OFFERED FOR 2022 – 2023 ACADEMIC YEAR**

The student will be given an in-depth exposure to benign gynecology, gynecologic surgery and the gynecologic aspects of a career in OBGYN. The student will be expected to function on an intern level as an integral member of the team, and to play an active role in the pre-operative, intra-operative and postoperative management of benign gynecological patients. The student will participate in comprehensive patient management, including pre-operative evaluation, Emergency Room consults, admission evaluation, development of diagnostic and therapeutic plans, and subsequent management.

Measurable learning objectives:

  • Discuss diagnosis and management of commonly encountered gynecology conditions (fibroids, polyps, endometriosis, urinary incontinence, prolapse, etc)
  • Describe indications for common abdominal, vaginal and laparoscopic procedures
  • Discuss work up and treatment options for common gynecologic disorders (abnormal vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, etc)
  • Discuss anticipated results and potential complications for various treatments of gynecological disorders
  • Demonstrate knowledge of preoperative and post-operative care

Learning experience:
The student will participate in all gynecology conferences, and will have the opportunity to hone their technical skills (including surgical skills, gynecologic exams, D&Cs, hysteroscopies, fascia and skin closures, gynecology ultrasounds, endometrial biopsies, etc) and will first assist on a variety of major and minimally invasive gynecology procedures. The student will round daily with the team and present to the attending on service. The student will perform complete admission histories and physicals, formulate a differential diagnosis, develop a diagnostic and therapeutic plan and present to the senior resident. The student will be responsible for subsequent management and daily follow-up for each patient assigned. The student will make a formal oral topic presentation to the gynecology residents and attending as well as submit a written case write-up. A typical day is 7 AM – 6 PM Monday thru Friday, plus two weekend day calls covering the gynecology consult service. The student will attend Statistics Conference, Departmental Grand Rounds and Resident School (on Tuesdays).

**Visiting Students interested in pursuing a residency spot are given the optional opportunity of taking a weekend call on Labor and Delivery at Weiler Hospital.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
In-the-moment feedback, house staff/attending evaluations, elective director written evaluation

Stephen Li, MD
stephen.li@nychhc.org
832-597-7298
Administrative Assistant: Cassandra Patterson
pattersc5@nychhc.org
718-918-6319
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

On the first day report to: Dr. Li’s office, Building 1, 3W22.

 

H605W Maternal-Fetal Medicine Elective

(Weiler Hospital and CFCC)

Students will join the perinatal team in diagnosing and managing various Maternal and Fetal complications of pregnancy. Students will gain experience by participating indirect patient care in multiple settings including the Obstetrical ultrasound unit, the Maternal-Fetal Assessment Center, and various high-risk pregnancy programs such as: the Diabetes in Pregnancy Program, HIV in Pregnancy Specialty Office, and the Cardio Obstetric Program. The student will have opportunities to also participate in the management of inpatient obstetrical high-risk patients, from admission through delivery, including involvement in daily rounds and all educational conferences.

Measurable learning objectives:

  • Describe the assessment of various maternal conditions affecting pregnancy
  • Discuss the diagnosis and management of commonly encountered obstetrical problems (such as Preterm Labor, Premature Rupture of Membranes, Preeclampsia, etc)
  • Describe fetal monitoring and antepartum fetal testing
  • Discuss the utilization of ultrasound in assessing fetal conditions
  • Perform a biophysical profile and basic biometric measurement on ultrasound
  • Describe prenatal diagnostic procedures (amniocentesis, chorionic villus sampling, fetal blood sampling, etc) and screening tests for aneuploidy (nuchal translucency, etc)
  • Present high-risk obstetrical patients in both outpatient and inpatient settings

Learning experience:
As part of the perinatal team, the student will see high-risk patients in various outpatient and inpatient settings, participating in screening, diagnosis and management of maternal and fetal disorders. Significant time will be spent in the Obstetrical ultrasound unit. The student will make a formal oral topic presentation to the MFM team. The student will attend Statistics Conference, Departmental Grand Rounds and Resident School (on Tuesdays).

**Visiting Students interested in pursuing a residency spot are given the optional opportunity of taking a weekend call on Labor and Delivery at Weiler Hospital.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
In-the-moment feedback, house staff/attending evaluations, elective director written evaluation

Diana Wolfe, MD
dwolfe@montefiore.org
917-502-1637
Administrative Assistant: Denise Mabry
dmbry@montefiore.org
718-430-2586
Blocks: 4-14
Maximum: 1

On the first day report to 1825 Eastchester Road, 6 South, Antepartum Service, 6:30 am.

 

H608G Family Planning

(Weiler Hospital/Montefiore Medical Park)

The student participating in this elective will be part of the family planning team and will contribute to the management of women in our outpatient ambulatory care facility. In addition, the student will also participate in OR cases and inpatient consultations. Clinical exposures include medical and surgical management of abortion and pregnancy failure in the first and second trimester, high-risk contraception consultation and provision of all contraceptive methods, including intrauterine devices, contraceptive implants and transcervical sterilization. Upon completing this rotation, the student should have a comprehensive understanding of the complexities of reproductive decision making, procedural and non-procedural aspects of pregnancy management in the first and second trimester and modern methods of contraception. It is hoped that the student will also learn compassionate, patient-centered and nonjudgmental strategies to communicate with patients about these issues as well.

Measurable learning objectives:

  • Discuss the public health impact of unintended pregnancy in the U.S. and abroad
  • Discuss medical abortion and pregnancy failure management in the first trimester
  • Discuss the full range of contraceptive medications, devices and surgical procedures
  • Analyze the family planning medical literature in a critical manner
  • Demonstrate clinical skills, including counseling, sonography, preoperative and postoperative management, as they relate to surgical abortion and pregnancy failure management

Learning experience:
The student will participate in the evaluation and management of patients who present for care in the ambulatory setting. They will actively participate in sonography for pregnancy dating. The student will first observe and then actively participate in providing comprehensive contraception counseling. The student will observe and participate in surgical cases at both Weiler Hospital and Jacobi Medical Center, as well as inpatient consultations at Weiler Hospital. Participation in monthly Family Planning Journal Clubs is expected. The student will complete the Family Planning Curriculum, which will be provided the first day of the elective, and will present a formal case/topic presentation to the Family Planning team. The student will attend Statistics Conference, Departmental Grand Rounds and Resident School (on Tuesdays).

**Visiting Students interested in pursuing a residency spot are given the optional opportunity of taking a weekend call on Labor and Delivery at Weiler Hospital.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
In-the-moment feedback, house staff/attending evaluations, elective director written evaluation

Textbook: (Suggested):
ISBN: 978-1732055605
Cost: 100$
Title: Contraceptive Technology
Edition: 21st
Author: James Trussel

Erika Levi, MD
elevi@montefiore.org

Leung, Wendy MD
Wendy.Leung@nychhc.org
718-405-8260
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

On the first day report to 1695 Eastchester Rd-Suite 306 at 9 AM

Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (OPHT)

T502 Clinical Ophthalmology 

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses Campus)

Students participate in the daily activities of the Ophthalmology Clinic and attend the regularly scheduled conferences of the department. Students observe major and minor surgical procedures in the Moses, Wakefield, and Hutchinson Tower operating rooms and minor procedure rooms. Students also participate in case conferences and review surgical videos with the instructor. Participants are encouraged to participate in patient care with resident and attending faculty supervision.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:
– To become facile with the basic eye exam
– To learn how to use the direct and indirect ophthalmoscope and the slit lamp biomicroscope
– To understand how systemic disease affects the eye
– To gain exposure to the field of ophthalmology as a potential career

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Students participate in case conferences with immediate feedback from the preceptor.

Richard P. Gibralter, MD
jarosenb@montefiore.org
718-920-7646
Administrative support:
Margaret Kealy
mkealy@montefiore.org
718-920-7646
Blocks: All
Maximum: No visiting students in block 1. For all other blocks, 4 students maximum.

Students must contact Margaret Kealy for meeting time and location 2 weeks prior to the start date.

Orthopaedic Surgery (ORTH)

 

Visiting students must apply through VSAS using Einstein’s pre-set rotation dates. Once approved for the elective, please contact Courtney Matlach to make any changes to your preferred rotation dates. Once confirmed with the department, the dates will be updated in VSAS.

**Einstein students must contact Courtney Matlach for approval prior to registration** **Visiting students must submit their step 1 score report on VSAS**

The course consists of a four-week rotation on specific orthopaedic services contained within the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. This rotation offers the 4th year medical student an opportunity to participate in the management of patients with musculoskeletal injury and disease. Rotating students will have a chance to join the orthopaedic team on the ward, in the emergency room, in the operating room, and in the outpatient setting. Students will also participate in the didactic program of the department and the specific service to which they have been assigned. It is the goal of the rotation to have the student gain an overview of and experience in musculoskeletal evaluation and treatment. It is designed for students interested in gaining additional knowledge about orthopaedic surgery and/or students wishing to become orthopaedic surgeons. Students are given the opportunity to spend time at Jacobi where there is more exposure to high energy trauma.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:

  • To gain an understanding of the different types of orthopaedic practices and procedures.
  • To understand the principles behind the evaluation and treatment of orthopaedic patients.
  • To gain operating room exposure and experience.
  • To demonstrate the ability to present and give a comprehensive case history presentation and discussion.

Learning experience:

Each student is assigned to 1-2 specific orthopaedic teams in the following services:

  • Adult Reconstruction Service
  • Sports Medicine Service
  • Shoulder & Elbow Service
  • Pediatric Orthopaedic Service
  • Foot & Ankle Service
  1. The student is an integral member of the team and responsible for rounding on patients and providing clinical care in the emergency room and operating room.
    2. The student is required to spend one night during the rotation on-call at the Jacobi Hospital Emergency Room. While on-call, the students are expected to assist the junior resident on-call in the evaluation and management of acute orthopaedic injuries.
    3. The student is responsible for actively participating in didactic and service-specific conferences. The didactic program consists of weekly conferences and Grand Rounds, at which time the student should be prepared to answer questions tailored to their abilities and knowledge.
    4. Students will be required to prepare and present a formal talk at the end of the rotation.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
The students are evaluated by the residents and faculty with whom they have interacted with on their assigned service. They are evaluated based on their performance during the rotation, including knowledge base, ability to work as a team member, and interactions with patients and peers. In addition, students are requested to submit an evaluation of the rotation itself prior to the end of the rotation.

Course Director: Konrad I. Gruson, MD kgruson@montefiore.org
Program Administrator: Courtney Matlach, cmatlach@montefiore.org , 347-577-4410
Maximum: 4
Blocks: 1-7

On the first day students report to: Students will report to the Hutch Campus for an orientation meeting and then will report to their assigned service.

Otolaryngology (OTOL)

A405 Clinical Clerkship in Otolaryngology

(Montefiore Medical Center)

A405 Clinical Clerkship in Otolaryngology

(Montefiore Medical Center)

This 4-week rotation is designed for students interested in careers in Family Practice, Medicine, Pediatrics and Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery. Students will obtain skills in the clinical examination and diagnosis of problems in the Head and Neck including otoscopy, nasal endoscopy and laryngoscopy for both adult and pediatric patients. They will learn and participate in the basics of airway management, sinus disease and hearing disorders, cancers of the head and neck as well as general ear, nose and throat anatomy and disease. Students are expected to be an active part of the otolaryngology team, supplement their clinical exposure with reading, and participate in office hours with attendings. Amply opportunity will be created for student to observe or assist with surgical procedures, tailored teach individual’s interest. The majority of the rotation will be at Montefiore Medical Center with one week spent at the Hutchinson Ambulatory Center, located approximately 5 miles from Montefiore. In addition, students are expected to attend all conferences and give a brief presentation on a topic related to otolaryngology at the end of the rotation.

Mona Gangar, MD
mgangar@montefiore.org
Contact: Ms. Maggie Ayala, marayala@montefiore.org, 718-920-4267
Blocks: All
Maximum: 4

On the first day students report to: Students will get an email prior to the rotation start date with meeting location and time.

Department of Pathology

M400 Introduction to Anatomic Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**Einstein students must contact the course directors for approval prior to registration. Once approval has been granted Einstein students should contact the Registrar’s Office regarding registration dates**
**Visiting Students should submit the visiting student application on VSAS and if accepted into the rotation should email the Office of the Registrar (Einstein-MDRegistrar@einsteinmed.org) regarding exact registration dates**

This two-week elective introduces medical students to the multiple laboratories that make up the Department of Pathology at the Montefiore Medical Center. This elective is beneficial to all medical students as it allows the students to experience the various areas of Pathology, examine the role of Pathologists in a hospital/clinical setting, and observe their interactions with clinicians from multiple hospital departments.

Dr. Sun Chung
suchung@montefiore.org
718-430-2222
Blocks: All except blocks 3 & 4
Maximum: 2

One month prior to the approved, scheduled rotation, students must contact the pathology chief residents at pathology.mmc@gmail.com to organize their rotation itinerary.

 

M401 Introduction to Molecular Pathology and Genomic Testing 

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**Einstein students must contact Dr. Naeem for approval prior to registration**

Molecular Pathology and Genomic testing course is designed to cover over all review of genomic testing. Strategies for diagnosis of genetic, infectious, and neoplastic diseases using molecular technologies are covered. We encourage students to observe some laboratory bench work-up of cases to understand the principals involved in measuring DNA, polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, array CGH and NGS. Where applicable we study, correlation with clinical and other laboratory data. Opportunities to participate in test development and small research projects are available for enthusiastic students and residents.

Resources or Recommended Textbook:
Schrijver I: Diagnostic Molecular Pathology in Practice: A Case-Based Approach
Cheng L, Zheng DY, Eble JN: Molecular Genetic Pathology, 2e, Springer
Leonard, Debra GB,. Molecular pathology in clinical practice Springer 2016.

Dr. Rizwan Naeem
rnaeem@montefiore.org
718-920-8101
Blocks: All except blocks 3 & 4
Max: 1 Student

 

M405 Surgical Pathology

(Montefiore Medical Center/Weiler Hospital)

**Einstein students must contact the course directors for approval prior to registration**
Diagnostic surgical pathology is an integral part of patient care. During the student’s rotation in surgical pathology they become part of the pathology team and will learn and be involved in the workflow of the pathology lab. More specifically, the students will observe and gross specimens (under guidance), perform microscopic examinations, and develop diagnoses based on the pathologic material and clinical input from various clinical services. Students will be expected to work-up and present an interesting case at the end of the rotation. Additional elective time in surgical pathology is available for interested students.

Dr. Sun Chung
suchung@montefiore.org
718-430-2222
Blocks: All except blocks 3 and 4
Maximum: 2

One month prior to the approved, scheduled rotation, students must contact the pathology chief residents at pathology.mmc@gmail.com to organize their rotation itinerary.

 

M410 Hematopathology 

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**Einstein students must contact the course directors for approval prior to registration**

Hematopathology is offered as a concentrated elective in the Anatomic and Clinical Pathology training program. It includes exposure to the major morphologic classification schemes of lymph node based diseases such as non-Hodgkin malignant lymphomas and Hodgkin lymphoma. When evaluating leukemia’s, as well as myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative disorders, bone marrow biopsies are correlated with bone marrow aspirate and peripheral blood smears in the majority of cases. Because of the nature of the diagnostic work-up for these diseases, there is additional emphasis placed on immunologic features using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry and also on T or B cell gene rearrangement abnormalities using the polymerase chain reaction, as well as cytogenetic/FISH and molecular study by NGS. Teaching sets are available for study.

Textbook Information: (Suggested) 
Ioachim’s Lymph Node Pathology, 4th edition
Chapter 1 (The normal lymph node)
Author: Harry L. Ioachim(Editor), L. Jeffrey Medeiros MD (Editor)

Henry’s Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods, 22nd Edition

Chapter 30 Basic examination of blood and bone marrow   part ‘Bone marrow examination’ page 533-538

ISBN-13: 978-0781775960

ISBN-10: 0781775965

ISBN-13: 978-1437709742

ISBN-10: 1437709745

Yanhua Wang, MD, PhD
ywang@montefiore.org
Yanan Fang, MD, PhD
yfang@montefiore.org
Administrative Support: Ms. Debrah Negron, denegron@montefiore.org, 718-920-6459
Blocks: All except block 3
Maximum 1

On the first day students report to: Ms. Negron at Moses campus, silver zone 4th floor, surgical pathology 8:30 am 

 

M412 Cytogenetics

 (Montefiore Medical Center – MMP)  

**Einstein students must contact Dr. Ramesh for approval prior to registration**

Cytogenetic training for students consists of a rotation of one month or more if interested or required. Routine pre, post-natal; cancer/molecular cytogenetic procedures; includes state of the art molecular cytogenetic diagnosis of constitutional and hematopoietic/solid tumor patient samples. Students are instructed in all aspects of cytogenetic analysis including indications for different procedures, sample accessioning, cell culture, harvesting chromosomes for cytogenetic/FISH/Microarray studies. This includes chromosome banding, computerized image analysis of karyotypes and FISH preparations, and including Microarray Testing. Cytogenetic, FISH, and Microarray nomenclature, analysis, and interpretation of chromosome/FISH/Microarray test results are also covered.  The cytogenetics rotation provides excellent exposure and background for students/residents/fellows to acquire competence to advise other physicians about indications for cytogenetic/FISH and Microarray testing, appropriate test procedures, and interpretation of test results. Additional elective time in cytogenetics is available for interested students to complete a small project if they wish to pursue.

General description and goals of elective: Introduce students to basic cytogenetic and molecular (FISH and Microarray Methodology) cytogenetic testing for genetic and malignant disorders.

Measurable learning objectives of elective: Cytogenetics; cancer genomics; molecular cytogentic testing.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Student case reports; cytogenetic/molecular cytogenetic questionnaire.  Feedback can be done online – New Innovation.

Textbook Information: (Suggested)
Medical Genetics by Thompson and Thompson
Principles of Medical Genetics by Steve Gershen
Genetic Counseling by Sutherland
Cytogenetics of Leukemias and Solid Tumors by Felix Mittleman
ISCN: An International System for Human Cytogenomic Nomenclature (2016), Eds. McGowan-Jordan, Simons, A, Schmid M, Karger Publications.

M412 Cytogenetics Curriculum

Dr. K. H. Ramesh
kramesh@montefiore.org
718-405-8106
Administrative support: Christine Morena, cmorena@montefiore.org, 718-904-2947
Secretarial Support: Susan Arthur, sarthur@montefiore.org, 718-405-8105
Blocks: All except blocks 1 & 2
Maximum: 1

On the first day students must report to Mahnaz Zohouri at 1635 Poplar St. Bronx, NY, 2nd Floor, 9:00AM.

 

M414 Cytopatology 

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**Einstein students must contact Dr. Colanta for approval prior to registration**

The elective is intended to give medical students an introduction to the field of Cytopathology, which also would serve as preliminary exposure to Anatomic Pathology and the lab in general (especially for students with no previous electives in Pathology). The student will observe the practice of fine needle aspiration biopsy performed by Cytopathologists/ Cytopathology fellows and adequacy assessment for deep fine needle aspiration biopsies. The student will get exposure to a variety of exfoliative and aspiration Cytology cases.  Also we offer participation in a variety of projects that utilize cytology specimens. Some projects consist mainly of retrospective studies of a certain type of neoplasm or organ involvement and are primarily of clinical nature.  The student may participate at a variety of levels (search data base for cases, retrieve archival material,  case review, etc.)

Measurable learning objectives of elective: Since this is mainly an observation kind of elective, active participation in the daily activities and projects is sufficient in achieving the objective of the elective.

Learning experience: Monday to Fri  8 am-5 pm. The student is expected to participate in the daily case review and sign out with the Cytopathology fellows/ Cytopathologists, attend the weekly conferences, and observe performance of fine needle aspiration biopsies.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Direct and immediate feedback, in addition to written evaluation.

Agnes Colanta, MD
acolanta@montefiore.org
718-920-5025
Administrative Support: Frances Mendez, fmendez@montefiore.org, 718-920-2761
Maximum: 1
Blocks: All except 3 – 5

On the first day students report to Dr. Samer Khader at Moses, Hofheimer, Rm. 409 at 9:00 am 

Department of Pediatrics

N203 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

(Jacobi Medical Center)

In this elective, students will be involved in the care of sick or premature newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit. Under attending supervision, the student will participate in all aspects of neonatal care. The students will be responsible for devising and implementing a management plan for each of their patients. They will be responsible for it all patient care issues, including fluid management, ventilatory management and drug therapy in the NICU. In addition, the student will attend high risk deliveries and will participate in delivery room management. Students will make daily rounds with the staff, write progress notes and attend all scheduled conferences. Students are encouraged to take night call on an every fourth night basis. Also, teaching conferences elsewhere in the Lewis M. Fraad Department at of Pediatrics at the Jacobi Medical Center are also open to the student.

Beth Nagourney, MD
beth.nagourney@nychhc.org
718-918-6655,
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

On the first day students report to: Jacobi NICU, Building 1,7 North at  7:00 a.m.

N205 Pediatric Infectious Diseases

(Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)

This elective is offered for students who would like to gain an understanding of a variety of Pediatric Infectious Disease issues. These include: Nosocomial and Community Acquired Infectious; Infection Control; Infectious in the compromised host; The Functions of the Microbiology Laboratory; Rational basis for antibiotic selection; Pathophysiology of common infectious diseases; Vaccine usage and the development of new vaccines. The elective centers on Pediatric Infectious Diseases consultants with the guidance of the ID Fellow and Attending. Attending rounds are held on a daily basis. Students are expected to familiarize themselves with basic texts and journals pertinent to Pediatric Infectious Disease. Students also attend ID Grand Rounds, Seminars, Journal Club, and Clinic.

Suggested texts include:

American Academy of Pediatrics, Pickering LK, et al editors. Red Book: 2012 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R eds. Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases Long S, et al eds. Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

David Goldman, MD
david.goldman@einsteinmed.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2

Students to contact Dr. Goldman for time and place to meet the first day

 

N206 Pediatric Mineral, Heavy & Trace Metal Metabolism 

(Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)

The elective aims to introduce the student to metal toxicology, specifically childhood lead poisoning. This can be accomplished through attendance at the Lead Clinic and participation in lead related research and educational outreach activities. Clinical Experience, Clinical Research, Readings and Tutorials.
1. Calcium, Phosphate and Vitamin D Metabolism.
2. Trace metal metabolism related to heavy metals, nutrition and various disorders in mineral metabolism.

Learning objectives:
Be able to identify sources of lead exposure
Be able to describe routes of entry
Understand measures of lead in the environment and in humans
Learn the specific of lead metabolism in humans
Be able to formulate a treatment plan for childhood lead poisoning

Learning experience:

Attend Lead Clinic (meets weekly)
Attend Health fairs or presentations at Head Starts for dissemination of lead/healthy homes information (1-2 a month)
Possibility to develop and complete a research project

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Oral and written evaluations

Textbook information:  Important documents will be provided during elective

Morri Markowitz, MD
morri.markowitz@einsteinmed.org
718-547-2789 ext.218
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

First day meeting location: 91 E. Mosholu Pkwy North

 

N207 Pediatric Infectious Disease 

(Jacobi Medical Center)

This 4-week elective introduces the fourth year medical student to the fundamentals of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, with a focus on children with HIV infection. Through active participation in daily consultation rounds on hospitalized infants, children and adolescents, twice-weekly HIV (“PCS”) clinics, as well as Infectious Diseases clinics, students will learn the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of a broad range of diseases. Formal didactics will include core lectures, joint Einstein-Montefiore Infectious Disease Grand Rounds, Jacobi HIV Grand Rounds, and Center for AIDS Research seminars at Einstein. A microbiology laboratory mini-rotation will introduce the fundamentals of microbiological diagnosis. Teaching conferences elsewhere in the Lewis M. Fraad Department at of Pediatrics at the Jacobi Medical Center are also open to the student.

Joanna Dobroszycki, MD
718-918-4667
joanna.dobroszycki@nychhc.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

 

N209 Community Pediatrics 

(Jacobi Medical Center)

This elective takes place at Jacobi Medical Center and throughout NYC with community partners. The goals of this elective are: Develop an understanding of the importance of non-medical issues on pediatric health. Be aware of the impact of cultural issues on the medical encounter and health in general. Be aware of the impact of economics on children’s health and the resources available to families. Be aware of the impact of environmental issues on children’s health and development. Learn to identify problems in community and design-implement solutions through advocacy. To accomplish these goals, the student will: Attend pediatric clinic in an ethnically-diverse primary care setting. Spend a day in Family Court with lawyers specializing in representing and advocating for disenfranchised families. Conduct a shopping trip to “purchase” pediatric items. Become familiar with health insurance options and the impact of access to care on health needs. Assist in preparing and serving lunch at a center for homeless families. Conduct a home visit (with attending physician) with emphasis on the home environment. Accompany a case manager to visit a technology-dependent child at home. Spend a day at St. Mary’s Hospital-a long term care facility for children. Attend an international travel clinic. Spend a day with a lactation consultant. Attend the Family Advocacy Program with Dr. Olga Jimenez (center for abused children). Participate in a program teaching about healthy choices to local elementary school children.

Hannah Keppler, MD
kepplerh1@nychhc.org
Arnoldys Stengel, MD
stengela@nychhc.org
718-918-4084
Maximum: 1
Blocks: Based on Einstein Sub-Internship cycle dates.  Not offered Cycles8 and 9.

On the first day students report to Jacobi Medical Center, Building #8, Room 1B-158 at 9 AM

N210 Family Advocacy

(Jacobi Medical Center)

The Family Advocacy Program (FAP) is a Child Advocacy Center dedicated to the identification, assessment and treatment of children and adolescents who present with a history of sexual abused/sexual assault and/or physical abuse and/or neglect. FAP is a member of the National Children’s Alliance and member of the Bronx Multidisciplinary Alliance on Child Physical and Sexual Abuse. FAP consists of a diverse and culturally sensitive staff with vast knowledge and experience in working with children that have been abused. The scope of services provided at FAP include but are not limited to expert forensic evaluations, medical evaluations, forensic sexual assault examinations, psychosocial assessments, expert court testimony, expert consultation, trainings, case-tracking, assistance with crime victims services, advocacy and individual, family and group therapy. During this rotation, the student will accompany Dr. Jimenez-Scheer and/or other team members during every stage of the evaluation and management process: initial contact, interview, physical examination, and liaison with other agencies (law enforcement, child protection, lawyers, family and criminal courts). There will be an opportunity to observe joint interviews, medical evaluations, consultations and attend case review, trainings and borough wide meetings. Teaching conferences in the Lewis M. Fraad Department at of Pediatrics at the Jacobi Medical Center are also open to the student.

The medical student will participate in the evaluation of children when there is a concern for possible physical or sexual abuse and/or neglect. The medical student will spend time with the multidisciplinary team at FAP learning each team member’s role and responsibilities. The student will join the social workers during psychosocial assessments of the families, will observe forensic interview of the children and will join the child abuse pediatrician during the medical evaluations at the Family Advocacy Clinic. The medical student will accompany the child abuse pediatrician when consultations are requested from the inpatient unit, clinics or emergency department. The medical students will participate in the weekly case review meetings and monthly borough-wide multidisciplinary team meetings. The medical student will receive education on child abuse pediatrics and will be provided with educational materials to enhance his/her knowledge about child abuse topics. The student will be invited to any training offered during the FAP rotation. At the end of the rotation the student will give a presentation on a child abuse topic. The goal of this elective is to obtain general knowledge of the reporting and evaluation of children when there is a concern for possible child abuse or neglect.

General description and goals of elective: The goals of this elective is to enhance student’s knowledge about child abuse and maltreatment, the evaluation process, treatment and prevention.

Measurable learning objectives of elective: 
-Know how to report a case of suspected child abuse
-Learn basics about performing a medical evaluation when abuse is suspected
-Learn possible signs and symptoms of physical abuse
-Learn possible signs and symptoms of sexual abuse
-Learn some of the conditions commonly confused with child abuse
-Learn when to refer a child to a child advocacy center

Learning experience: 
-Students will be present at FAP from Monday through Thursday 9 AM to 5 PM
-Students will receive a schedule describing their activities during their rotation at FAP
-Students will attend clinic sessions at FAP
-Students will participate in case review/discussion with FAP team
-Students will attend training scheduled during their FAP rotation
-Students will be responsible for preparing and presenting a lecture on a child abuse topic
-Students will meet with each member of the FAP team to learn about the child abuse evaluation and each member’s role and responsibilities.
-Students will have dedicated time to review the educational materials provided at FAP.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Student will meet with child abuse pediatrician at the end of their rotation for feedback and evaluation. An evaluation will be completed by director of the rotation and returned to the medical school.

Textbook(s) information: (Suggested)
ISBN-10: 1581102089
Cost: $129.95
Title: Child Abuse Medical Diagnosis and Management
Authors: Robert M. Reece and Cindy Christian
Edition: 3rd edition
Published by the American Academy of Pediatrics

Olga M. Jimenez-Scheer, MD
olga.jimenez@nychhc.org
718-918-4013
Administrative Support: Ms. Nancy Roldan, ACM, nancy.roldan@nychhc.org, 718-918-4182
Maximum: 1
Blocks: All

On the first day students report to the Family Advocacy Program Office at Jacobi Medical Center. Jacobi Building #1 3 floor North West Suite A 1400 Pelham Parkway South, Bronx NY 10461 Phone: 718-918-4183 at 9 AM.  Students should contact Dr. Jimenez-Scheer, by email or phone, the week prior to their start in order to verify time and location. 

N211 Pediatric Endocrinology 

(Jacobi Medical Center)

Elective NOT offered during the 2022 – 2023 academic year

The Pediatric Endocrinology service at Jacobi cares for children with a wide variety of endocrine diseases, such as Type I and Type II diabetes, short stature, failure to thrive, pubertal disorders, menstrual disorders, polycystic ovary syndrome, thyroid disorders, and obesity. The student in this elective will work under the supervision of the Pediatric Endocrinology attending in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The majority of the rotation will occur in the various outpatient clinics: Endocrinology, Endocrine Testing, and Diabetes. The student will be expected to see patients independently, but will be closely supervised by an attending. Less than one quarter of the time will be spent on the inpatient service, where the student will be responsible for the initial evaluation and assessment of each new consult, as well as the daily follow-up of all patients on the endocrinology service. The student will present the patient to the attending and the differential diagnosis, management and treatment options will be further discussed. Additionally, reading topics will be assigned and further discussed with the attending. The student will be expected to give a 45-minute presentation on a selected pediatric endocrine topic to a small group at the end of the rotation. Students will attend the outpatient endocrinology conferences, as well as the other teaching conferences in the Pediatrics Department (Grand Rounds, Chairman’s Rounds, noon conference, etc.).

Miriam Silfen, MD
718-918-4135
miriam.silfen@nychhc.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2

Student should contact Dr. Silfen 2 weeks prior to start date to confirm where to report on first day of elective.

N212 Pediatric Pulmonary 

(Jacobi Medical Center)

The Pediatric pulmonary service at Jacobi cares for children with a wide variety of pulmonary diseases. The student in this elective will work under the supervision of the Pediatric Pulmonary attending in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. About half of the time will be spent on the inpatient service, where the student will be responsible for the initial evaluation and assessment of each new consult, as well as, the daily follow up of all patients on the pulmonary service. The patients will be presented to the attending and the differential diagnosis, management plans and treatment options will be further discussed. In addition, the student will assist the pulmonologist during bronchoscopies. The other half of the rotation will occur in the Jacobi Pediatric Asthma Center, as well as, the Pulmonary and Allergy clinics. The student will be expected to see patients independently, but will be closely supervised by one of the attendings. Students will attend the bimonthly outpatient pulmonary conferences, the monthly radiology conference and other teaching conference elsewhere in the Pediatric Department (grand rounds, Chairman’s Rounds, noon conferences, etc.). Method of student feedback and evaluation will be an oral presentation at the end of the rotation.

Denise Serebrisky, MD
718-918-6984
denise.serebrisky@nychhc.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

Contact Dr. Serebrisky by email for meeting time and location. 

N302 Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition 

(The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)

General description and goals of elective:
To improve competency in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

Measurable learning objectives of elective: As per the specific competencies described on AECOM website: https://www.einstein.yu.edu/education/md-program/curriculum/
Professionalism: Participants must demonstrate a commitment to carrying out professional responsibilities, adherence to ethical principles, and sensitivity to a diverse patient population.
Patient Care: Participants must be able to provide patient care that is compassionate, appropriate, and effective for the treatment of health problems and the promotion of health.
Skills Acquisition:
– Perform a thorough history to assess the presence of gastrointestinal disease.
– Interpret physical findings with respect to gastrointestinal disease processes.
– Order and interpret pertinent laboratory findings needed in the evaluation of gastrointestinal diseases.

Learning experience: 
1. Daily inpatient rounds with fellow and attending physician.
2. Participation in outpatient clinics.
3. Attend endoscopy sessions.
4. Attend departmental morning and division conferences
5. Choose two topics during the month to put together a 20 min oral (no need for PowerPoint) presentation for the attending, fellow, and other rotating residents
6. Complete suggested reading of enclosed articles and GI topics

Please review the GI rounding template, which contains useful information for inpatient GI care: https://docs.google.com/document/d/19mxSW2hqYEzRuv2QanxMQ9hcGpoYT-FpplEAtlDoBVE/edit?usp=sharing

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback mid-way through the rotation and at the end of the rotation.

Readings: 
All readings can be found at: http://www.naspghan.org/content/63/en/professional-education/publications/clinical-guidelines. However, it is strongly encouraged for rotators to dive deeper into the literature depending on the assigned topic from the attending or as regards to a specific patient.

Anthony Loizides, MD
aloizide@montefiore.org
718-741-2332
Administrative support: Janayra Quinones, jquinone@montefiore.org
718-741-2332
Maximum: 1
Blocks: All

On the first day students report to 3411 Wayne Avenue 7th Floor, Bronx, NY 10467 at 8:00 AM.

N303 Pediatric Emergency Medicine

(Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)
The MMC pediatric ED at CHAM offers a full month senior elective in Pediatric Emergency Medicine which will introduce the student to all phases of acute care of ill and injured children. The student will become part of the PED staff, which includes subspecialty trained PEM attending physicians, PEM fellows, pediatric and general EM residents and third year medical students. The PED at CHAM cares for approximately 150-160 children a day presenting with a variety of urgent and emergent problems. Students will see patients independently with close supervision by the PEM Attendings and/or PEM fellows. Through one-on-one case-based learning centered around PED patients, the student will gain skills in focused history taking, directed physical examination, generating differential diagnosis, appropriate use of consultation and laboratory tests, as well as patient management. There will be opportunity to participate, first hand, in a variety of emergency procedures. Students will also be expected to attend weekly teaching conferences given by the Division. At the completion of the elective, the student will have experience in handling most of the common emergencies seen in the Pediatric ED as well other ambulatory settings.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:
Recognition of the acutely ill or injured pediatric patient
Explain the management of common pediatric emergencies
Development of the ability to interact effectively with acutely ill children and their parents

Learning experience:
Students evaluate patients of all acuity levels in the Pediatric ED under the supervision of a Pediatric Attending physician.  Each week, students will primarily work daytime shifts in the ED and may also attend a variety of resident level conferences including: pediatric resident core conferences, PED resident conference and Professors’ Rounds.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Students receive real-time feedback by the precepting Attending during and after each case presentation.

Textbook(s) information:
ISBN: 1605471593
Cost $252 new
Title: Textbook of Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Edition: 6th
Author: Fleisher and Ludwig
This reading is optional (a copy is available for use in the Pediatric ED)

Victoria Shulman, MD, vshulman@montefiore.org
Administrative Support: JoAnne Walters, jowalters@montefiore.org, 718-920-5312
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2

Students will be receiving an email a month prior to their start date which outlines the hours, location to start on the first day, and general expectations of the elective.  If you have not received that email please contact Dr. Shulman on her cell phone.

 

N304 Pediatric Medical Genetics 

(Children’s Hospital at Montefiore and satellite clinics)

During the course of this one month elective, by working hand-in-hand with the staff of the Division of Genetic Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics, the student will gain experience in approaching children and adults with congenital malformations and genetic diseases. Experience is gained by working with our staff at CHAM, as well as at the Division’s outreach sites, including The Hutch. The experience will emphasize history-taking, the physical exam, techniques of syndrome identification, appropriate ordering of genetic and biochemical results and genetic counseling of the family. Ethical, legal and social implications of genetic testing will also be emphasized.  Students will be encouraged to keep a diary of their day-to-day experiences.

Suggested textbook information:
ISBN: 0-7216-0615-6
Title: Smith’s Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation
Edition: 7th
Author: Kenneth L. Jones

Dr. Melissa Wasserstein, MD, Division Chief, mwassers@montefiore.org
718-741-2323 (Tricia Elliott, secretary)
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

Contact Dr. Paul Levy for first day reporting information (plevy@montefiore.org)

N305 Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 

(Montefiore Medical Center)

The goal of the elective experience is to acquaint the student with the various aspects of allergies and immunological disease. This includes experience with patients with rhinitis, sinusitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, HIV infection, and other immunological disorders. The student will have the opportunity to participate in various clinics and private practice situations with attendings and fellows, as well as participate in conferences and journal clubs that are part of the division’s monthly activities. The student will have the opportunity to learn the approach to diagnosis and management of allergic and immunological disorders.

Larry Bernstein, MD
labernst@montefiore.org
718-405-8530
Contact Ms. Nicole Karcich, nkarcich@montefiore.org, 718-405-8530 x2203 
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

On the first day report to 1525 Blondell Avenue, Suite 101, Bronx, NY 10461 at 9AM 

 

N501A Pediatric Nephrology

(Children’s Hospital at Montefiore

The student will gain experience in the fundamentals of clinical pediatric nephrology with rotations through the inpatient and outpatient services of the Division of Pediatric Nephrology. Emphasis will be placed on the normal contribution of the kidneys to growth and development and common disturbances of fluid and electrolyte physiology in infants and children. In addition, the student will become familiar with the major causes of acute and chronic kidney failure and hypertension in infants and children. The elective will provide the student the opportunity to participate with the Pediatric Nephrology Team, consisting of Pediatric Nephrology Attendings, Renal Fellows, Pediatric Urologist, Pediatric Nephrology Social Worker, Transplant Nurse Coordinator, Dialysis Nurse Specialist, Nutritionist and Child Psychiatrist, in the medical management of pediatric nephrology patients including the Children’s Dialysis and Transplantation Center. The student will become knowledgeable in the medical and psychosocial aspects of clinical pediatric nephrology by participation in a program of formal biweekly teaching rounds, seminars and journal clubs, and by the distribution of core educational material that will complement their practical experience. The student will be encouraged and supported to initiate a research project for presentation at the annual Student’s Research Day. Goals of Elective: To understand the principles of clinical pediatric nephrology in terms of maturation of renal function, fluid and electrolyte homeostasis and pathophysiologic states, common acute and chronic renal disorders including pediatric nephrologic emergencies with acute renal failure and hypertension, and congenital and acquired abnormalities of the genitourinary tract and kidneys.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:
Understanding and implementing elements of note-writing in pediatric nephrology.
Understand the stages of chronic kidney disease and how they progress from disease to dialysis to transplantation
Understand what is needed to get a kidney transplant
Understand the importance of disease prevention
Learning experience: shadowing with fellows at the beginning, later, depending on learner, co-manage a patient and learn to write daily notes on the inpatient setting. See patients in clinic and be precepted by fellows and faculty.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: oral and written

Suggested textbook:
ISBN: 9780781770309
Title: Pediatrics for Medical Student
Edition: Third
Author: Daniel Bernstein, MD and Steven P. Shelov, MD, MS

Beatrice Goilav, MD
bgoilav@montefiore.org
718-655-1120
Administrative Support: Maria Balingit, mdeguzma@montefiore.org and Gene Reyes gereyes@montefiore.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2

On the first day students report to The Children’s Kidney Center, 3326 Bainbridge Ave. at 9AM 

N503 Pediatric Emergency Room 

(Jacobi Medical Center)

The student in this elective will work along with pediatric and emergency medicine house staff in the Jacobi Pediatric Emergency Department. This is a busy service with approximately 125 patient visits per day. The elective is structured to give the student first-hand experience in the recognition and management of common acute illnesses of children, and will allow the student to learn basic emergency procedures such as suturing, and other minor surgical procedures.  Opportunities for involvement in the care of children with serious illness and injury are ample. The student will be expected to see patients independently with close attending instruction and supervision.  The student will learn to use the electronic medical record and have the ability to write notes and orders under direct supervision of attending physicians, and be able to review the medical record including all laboratory and radiographic studies.

 Measurable learning objectives of elective:
– Learn to perform problem-oriented histories and examinations in the ED setting.
– Learn to evaluate and manage pediatric patients who present to the ED with common signs and symptoms of illness.
– Learn to evaluate and manage acutely injured pediatric patients
– Learn basic emergency procedures

Learning experience:
The student will complete approximately 20 shifts for the rotation divided between day and evening shifts.  Day shifts are from 9AM to 5PM on weekdays, and evening shifts are from 1:00PM-10:00PM on weekdays.  Overnight and weekend shifts are not required but may be arranged with the course director if the student requests the opportunity.  The student is expected to attend pediatric Grand Rounds on Tuesdays and the daily noontime conferences.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
The student will receive ongoing feedback from attending physicians, and will have a formal written evaluation completed at the end of the rotation.

Textbook(s) information:
ISBN  ISBN-13: 9781451193954
Cost $279.99
Title  Fleisher & Ludwig’s Textbook of Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Edition  7th ed
Author KN Shaw, RG Bachur, Eds
Is this required or suggested?  Suggested reading.  Copy available in PED

ISBN  ISBN-10: 0521736870
Cost $115.00
Title  Clinical Manual of Emergency Pediatrics
Edition  5th ed
Author EC Crain and JC Gershel, Eds
Is this required or suggested?  Suggested reading.  Copy available in PED

Katherine J. Chou, MD, MS
katherine.chou@nychhc.org 
718-918-5312
Maximum: 2
Blocks: All except 3

On the first day students report to: PED at 9am (Students must contact Dr. Chou at least 4 weeks before the start of the rotation for further instructions)

N504 Pediatric Cardiology

 (Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)

Students are exposed to the entire range of congenital and acquired heart disease fetuses, infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. The main objective of the elective rotation is to provide the student with a basic understanding of pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of common forms of congenital and pediatric heart disease. Students will attend pediatric cardiology outpatient clinics, participate in teaching rounds, and observe procedures such as diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterization, invasive electrophysiology testing, and echocardiography. Students will attend weekly conferences that include interdisciplinary cardiac catheterization-surgical conference and grand rounds.
Learning objectives:
The student is expected to learn:
– Essentials of cardiovascular development and correlation of cardiac disorders with genetic syndromes.
– Applied cardiac physiology of fetal, transitional, neonatal, and adult circulation.
– Pediatric cardiovascular examination, including appropriate diagnostic evaluation of children with murmurs (innocent versus pathological).
– Common congenital heart defects that result in left-to-right shunts. These include
i) Ventricular septal defect
ii) Patent ductus arteriosus
iii) Atrial septal defect
iv) AV canal/AV septal defect (endocardial cushion defect).
– Common cyanotic congenital heart defects. These include
i) Tetralogy of Fallot
ii) Transposition of the great arteries
iii) Tricuspid atresia
iv) Truncus arteriosus
v) Pulmonary atresia/IVS
vi) Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection
vii) Hypoplastic left heart syndrome.
– Common obstructive cardiac lesions
i) Aortic stenosis
ii) Coarctation of the aorta,
iii) Interrupted aortic arch
iv) Pulmonary stenosis.
– Pathophysiology and basic principles of cardiac failure.
– Common acquired pediatric heart diseases
i) Kawasaki disease
ii) Rheumatic heart disease
iii) Viral myocarditis
iv) Infectious endocarditis
v) Cardiomyopathies
vi) Systemic hypertension.
– Interpretation of pediatric ECG’s, and diagnostic and therapeutic approach to common pediatric dysrhythmias (including genetic ion channelopathies).
– Common surgical procedures for congenital heart disease and the basic principles of pre-and post-operative care.
– Basic principles of echocardiography and its uses and limitations.
– Acquisition of clinical skills and medical knowledge is emphasized.

Learning experience: Key Responsibilities of the student while on Elective Pediatric Cardiology clinic : to maximize the clinical learning experience, the clinic at CHAM takes precedence over other clinical activities unless prior arrangements are made with the Pediatric Cardiology attending. The student will see patients with pediatric cardiology attendings. Clinical skills, pediatric EKG interpretation, and basic management of pediatric heart disease will be emphasized. Pediatric Cardiology rounds including PICU and CHAM 8: This offers an excellent opportunity to observe dynamic changes in the cardiovascular system, and also allows participation in the care of complex patients in an intensive care situation. Pediatric Cardiology consultation and in-patient service. The student must spend a few days of their rotation with inpatient fellow/attending and do consults. Cardiac catheterization and cardiac surgery. Observation of a couple cases is encouraged, since an understanding of invasive hemodynamic evaluation and assessment of cardiac anatomy, and principles of heart surgery, will be useful in understanding cardiac pathophysiology and the changes that can be anticipated with medical and surgical intervention.

Didactic Program
Students must attend: Cardiac Catheterization-Surgical Conference, Inpatient Rounds, EP Conference (optional), Echo Conference (optional).The student will be expected to present topics relevant to patients on the Cardiology service or of interest, as informal 10-15 minute talks at the end of the rotation.
Method of student feedback and evaluation: The Director of the Pediatric Cardiology elective, Dr. Sharma, compiles feedback from the faculty and fellows for the detailed overall evaluation. Students from outside institutions should make sure that Dr. Sharma receives their school’s evaluation forms by the end of the rotation.
Suggested Textbook:
ISBN-13  978-0-323-02367-2
Title  Pediatric Cardiology: The Requisites in Pediatrics
Author  Victoria L. Vetter

Ellis Rochelson, MD
erochels@montefiore.org
718-741-2343
Administrative support: Frank Varcasia, fvarcasi@montefiore.org, 718-741-2538
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

On the first day students report to: Rosenthal 1 at 9 AM. Dr. Rochelson provides a detailed course syllabus with schedules, a packet of articles, and an electronic version of the textbook for each trainee at the start of the rotation. Students should contact Dr. Rochelson a week prior to starting the elective to obtain an educational packet (erochels@montefiore.org).

N505 Pediatric Rheumatology 

(Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)

The elective is designed to introduce the student to the field of pediatric rheumatology. The student will shadow or be precepted by the attending physician in outpatient clinic. Students are required to attend sessions at CHAM with the option of attending additional session in Hartsdale and the Hutchinson Metro Center. All outpatients are reviewed at a weekly team meeting which the student attends. The student will perform initial and follow up consultations on inpatients and round on all inpatients with the pediatric rheumatology fellow and attending. The student will also have exposure to patients receiving minor procedures (ie. joint injections) and medication infusions in our day hospital. A didactic curriculum focused around clinical case discussions ensures that that student has exposure to the most commonly encountered pediatric rheumatology diagnoses. The student will attend Pediatric Rheumatology Grand Rounds/Journal Club, Pediatric Grand Rounds, Pediatric Rheumatology Chapter Review (based on the suggested textbook listed below) and Pediatric Professorial Rounds. The student will additionally attend monthly pathology, radiology and combined Pediatric Nephrology/Rheumatology conferences. The student will be expected to prepare and present a short presentation about a topic in pediatric rheumatology mutually agreed upon with the course leader.

Suggested textbook: 
ISBN: 9780323241458
Title: Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology
Edition: Seventh
Author: Ross Petty Ronald Laxer Carol Lindsley Lucy Wedderburn

Dawn Wahezi MD, MS
dwahezi@montefiore.org
718-696-2405
Administrative support: Madeline Colon, macolon@montefiore.org, 718-696-2401
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1
First day: report to 3334 Bainbridge Ave, 9 am

 

N506 Child Development in Pediatric Practice 

(RF Kennedy Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center (CERC), Van Etten, 1st Floor)

In this elective, the student learns about normal and aberrant child development through experiences at the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, primarily located at the Rose F. Kennedy Center at Van Etten. The student is exposed to children and adolescents with neuromuscular abnormalities, intellectual disabilities, language disorders, learning disabilities, school problems and autism spectrum disorders. Students have the opportunity to observe different facets of the multidisciplinary evaluation of children who present with developmental problems; as well as intervention strategies aimed at improving the child’s functional skills and/or behavior. Along with pediatric residents, students participate in a series of didactic sessions dealing with topics in child development and behavior. Visits to schools or sites offering other interventions can be arranged. Students will also be encouraged to undertake an independent study of a topic of interest. The goal of this elective is to emphasize the role of the pediatrician and family physician in identification, evaluation and follow up of children with disabilities, through working with the family and functioning as a child advocate within the community. Students are expected to fulfill the time commitment to activities scheduled during their elective period, weekdays 8:30am – 6pm (some days may start later or end earlier) unless arranged with course director in advance of registration.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:
–   Become knowledgeable about typical and atypical child development and behavior.
–   Use standardized, validated and accurate developmental and behavioral screening instruments, plus skills in interview, exam and medical knowledge to identify patterns of atypical development
–   Use a logical and appropriate clinical approach to the care of children who have behavioral or developmental concerns.
–  Understand the social determinants of health and the impact of adverse childhood experiences on child development and behavior.
–  Become familiar with the multidisciplinary evaluation and treatment of children with developmental and behavioral challenges

Learning experience: As above

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Oral feedback during rotation and written evaluation through the registrar at the conclusion of the rotation.

Elisa Muniz, MD
elmuniz@montefiore.org
718-839-7038
Administrative support: Ms. Sarah Rodriguez, srodrig1@montefiore.org, 718-430-3914
Maximum: 1
Blocks: All except 4,5 & 9

On the first day students report to: Dr. Benenson (location) at Please email Dr. Benenson, bbenenso@montefiore.org, and Ms. Rodriguez, srodrig1@montefiore.org, at least two weeks prior to the scheduled start of the elective to arrange meeting place and time. 

 

N508 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit 

(Two weeks at Weiler Hospital and two weeks at Wakefield Hospital)

This elective in Neonatal Intensive Care is offered in the Neonatal Special Care Unit (NICU) at the Jack D. Weiler-Einstein Hospital division of Montefiore. It is designed so as to provide the student with an appreciation and understanding of critical care medicine in the neonatal patient. Students will be involved in the care of patients under the supervision of the senior residents, fellows, and attending faculty. They will assume responsibility for 1 to 2 patients each week, write notes and present their patients on rounds. They are encouraged to attend the many available conferences including: Morning Report, Perinatal Conference, Fetal Diagnosis Rounds, Review and Management conferences, Morbidity and Mortality, Ethics, Journal Club, X-Ray and Ultrasound rounds and Research and Performance Improvement Seminars. Night call is encouraged, but not required.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:
– Provide family centered patient care that is developmentally and age appropriate, compassionate, and effective for the treatment of neonatal disease and the promotion of health.
– With the help of a neonatologist, identify key history and exam findings needed to evaluate neonates presenting with conditions related to neonatal medicine.
– Generate a logical and appropriate clinical approach to the care of neonates presenting for care, applying principles of evidence-based decision-making and problem solving.

Learning experience:
7:30-8:00AM – Pre-round on patients (student carries 1-2 patients under the guidance of a PGY-2/3)
8:00-9:00AM – Morning report/teaching conference (M-Th); on Fri: joint perinatal conf w/ OB from 7:30-8:30A
9:00AM-12:00/1:00PM – NICU attending rounds (student rounds with their assigned team)
Lunch
1:00-5:00PM – Patient care activities, including attending deliveries, implementing patient management plans,   meeting with families, participating in perinatal consults and attending any afternoon conferences; sign-out/hand-off patient care to night team

Method of student feedback and evaluation: verbal and written evaluations

Textbook(s) information: (Suggested)
ISBN E-book 978-1-118-76732-0 or paper book 978-1-118-76743-6
Cost 47.95$
Title Neonatology at a Glance, 3rd Edition,
Edition 3rd
Author Tom Lissauer, Avroy Fanaroff
Is this required or suggested? Suggested

Elective directors: Dr. Orna Rosen (Weiler) and Dr. Dr. Tamara Kalhan (Wakefield)
orosen@montefiore.org, tkalhan@montefiore.org
Administrative support: Amanda Feliciano, AMAFELIC@montefiore.org (Weiler), Wilmary Carrion, wcarrion@montefiore.org, 718-920-9014 (Wakefield)
Maximum: 1
Blocks: 6-14

On the first day students report to: Weiler or Wakefield NICU at 8 am. That will be decided prior to their arrival and they will be notified to where they will go.

N509 Neonatal/Pediatric ICU 

(Weiler Hospital/Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)

This combined elective in Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care is offered in the Neonatal Special Care Unit (NICU) at the Jack D. Weiler-Einstein Hospital division of Montefiore and the Pediatric Critical Care Unit (PCCU) at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore (CHAM). It is designed so as to provide the student with an appreciation and understanding of critical care medicine in the neonatal and pediatric patient. The rotation can be equally divided between the two units, or a student may spend one month in either the NICU or the PCCU. Students will be involved in the care of patients under the supervision of the senior residents, fellows, and attending faculty. They will assume responsibility for 1 to 2 patients each week, write admission notes and present their patients on rounds. They are encouraged to attend the many available conferences including: Morning Report, Perinatal Conference, Fetal Diagnosis Rounds, Review and Management conferences, Morbidity and Mortality, Ethics, Journal Club, X-Ray and Ultrasound rounds and Research and Performance Improvement Seminars. Night call is encouraged, but not required.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:
Neonatology
– Provide family centered patient care that is developmentally and age appropriate, compassionate, and effective for the treatment of neonatal disease and the promotion of health.
– With the help of a neonatologist, identify key history and exam findings needed to evaluate neonates presenting with conditions related to neonatal medicine.
– Generate a logical and appropriate clinical approach to the care of neonates presenting for care, applying principles of evidence-based decision-making and problem solving.

Pediatric Critical Care
– Provide family centered patient care that is developmentally and age appropriate, compassionate, and effective for the treatment of critically ill pediatric patients.
– Identify key history and exam findings needed to evaluate critically ill children.
– Begin to apply fundamental physiology and pathophysiology to assessments and management plans of critically ill children.

Learning experience:
Neonatology 
7:30-8:00 AM – Pre-round on patients (student carries 1-2 patients under the guidance of a PGY-2/3)
8:00-9:00 AM – Morning report/teaching conference (M-Th); on Fri: joint perinatal conf w/ OB from 7:30-8:30A
9:00 AM-12:00/1:00 PM – NICU attending rounds (student rounds with their assigned team)
Lunch
1:00-5:00 PM – Patient care activities, including attending deliveries, implementing patient management plans, meeting with families, participating in perinatal consults and attending any afternoon conferences; sign-out/hand-off patient care to night team

PCCU
7:00-8:00 AM – Pre-round on patients (student carries 1-2 patients under the guidance of a PGY-2/3)
7:15-8:00 AM (W/Th) – PCCU teaching conference
8:00 AM-11:00 AM/12:00 PM – PCCU attending rounds (student rounds with their assigned team)
12:00 PM-5:00 PM – Patient care activities, including admitting new patients, implementing patient management plans, meeting with families, participating in procedures and attending any afternoon conferences; sign-out/hand-off patient care to night team

Method of student feedback and evaluation: verbal and written evaluations

Textbook(s) Information:
NICU
ISBN: 978-1405199513
Cost: $43.95
Title: Neonatology at a Glance 2nd Edition
Edition: 2nd
Author: Tom Lissauer, Avroy Fanaroff
Is this required or suggested? Suggested

PCCU
ISBN: 978-1607950103
Cost: $36.34
Title: Manual of Pediatric Intensive Care
Edition: 1 st
Author: Haresh M. Kirpalani et al
Is this required or suggested? Suggested

Orna Rosen, MD (2 week NICU part of elective), orosen@montefiore.org, 718-904-4105
Mark Schlomovich, MD (2 week PCCU part of elective), MSHLOMOV@montefiore.org, 718 484 5123
Administrative support/Contact: Jayne Ellison, JELLISON@montefiore.org
Blocks: 6-14
Maximum: 1
For the NICU portion of the elective: On the first day students report to Weiler Hospital NICU, 5th floor, 1825 Eastchester Road, Bx, NY 10461 at 7:30 AM

For the PCCU portion of the elective: On the first day students report to the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, PCCU, CHAM 10th floor, 3415 Bainbridge Ave, Bx, NY 10467 at 7:00 AM.

 

N510 Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

(The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)

The Division of Hematology/Oncology at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore cares for children with a wide variety of cancers and non-malignant blood disorders. The program is large and dynamic, but elective students will be given individual attention during their rotation. The pediatric hematology oncology attending staff will closely supervise and provide individual teaching to each student. For two weeks, students will participate in the care of our pediatric hematology/oncology inpatient unit and will participate in daily teaching rounds. They will also assess and help manage patients on the inpatient consultation service. During the other two weeks, students will attend daily outpatient clinic sessions, where they will see patients on their own, precepted by an attending physician. One morning per week, they will participate in outpatient procedures (bone marrow aspirations/biopsies; lumbar punctures with administration of chemotherapy). When not in clinic, they will continue participation in the inpatient consultation service. Elective students will be encouraged to participate in a wide array of educational and patient care activities of the division, including weekly Tumor Board, lectures, bone marrow and blood morphology reviews, and clinical care conferences, as well as, monthly journal club, hematopathology conference and oncology protocol review. Short  research or case reports may be available to interested students.  All students receive oral feedback on the inpatient service and in the outpatient clinics.

Textbook(s) information:
ISBN: 978-0-12-375154-6
Cost: approx. $150 (but is also available on-line on the Einstein library website for free)
Title: Manual of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology
Edition: 5th
Author: Philip Lanzkowsky
Is this required or suggested? suggested

Leanne Ostrodka, MD
lostrodk@montefiore.org  
718-741-2342
Administrative support: Rozina Pijuan, rdijuan@montefiore.org, 718-741-2342
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

On the first day of the elective students should report to 3411 Wayne Avenue, 9th floor.  Students are expected to contact Dr. Ostrodka by email at least 1 WEEK PRIOR to the first day of their elective to discuss start time.  

 

N511 Adolescent Medicine 

(Jacobi Medical Center)

The Adolescent Medicine Division in the Dept. of Pediatrics at Jacobi serves a dynamic population of young people 12 to 21 years of age. The goal of the rotation is for the student to initiate familiarity with the challenges and rewards of provision of health care to adolescents.  The student in this elective will work directly under the supervision of the Director and her staff, primarily in the outpatient setting, though exposure to adolescent in-patients may also occur.  Teenagers with a wide variety of issues will be evaluated, including morbidity from high-risk behaviors confronting urban youth and their families (violence, drugs, alcohol, unplanned pregnancy, and STI’s for example) as well as general adolescent growth and development needs. The student will become familiar with routine health issues for all adolescents such as nutrition, acne and other dermatological care, common orthopedic problems, menstrual disorders and routine gynecology as well as psychosocial stressors involving family, the educational system and the peer group.  Additionally the student will be directly involved in our contraceptive services including provision of LARC to teens. Teaching conferences elsewhere in the Lewis M Fraad Dept. of Pediatrics at JMC are also open to the student.

Learning objectives:
– Obtain a complete medical history of the adolescent patient including in-depth psychosocial assessment (supervised closely by the faculty/staff).
– Do a complete physical examination of the adolescent (including maturational index staging of the breasts and genitals) under the supervision of the Director and her staff.
– Learn to provide accurate, objective written documentation of the adolescent assessment via the electronic medical record, including appropriate differential diagnoses, reviewed by the Director/staff.
– Review any laboratory data obtained on the patients with the Director/staff and recommend appropriate patient follow-up plans.
– Research and present a 20-30 minute power point discussion on a student’s area of interest in adolescent medicine with a focus on up-to-date strategies, treatments, etc.

Learning experience: Students will actively participate in all aspects of patient care for adolescent in the out-patient and in-patient arenas 5 days/week (excludes weekends). Under the supervision of the Director and her staff the student will evaluate the patients, perform appropriate exams (determined by the nature of the patient visit/complaint), present the patients to the Director/staff and include a differential diagnosis. They will then recommend appropriate lab studies and document the evaluation in the electronic medical record. Students should come to realize that provision of healthcare to the adolescent patient while at times may be challenging it should always be rewarding and quite satisfying.  This elective seeks to optimize the medical students’ experience with this vital population.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: oral feedback providing continually with written feedback provided at the end of the elective.

Textbook(s) information: the students are guided to read relevant, updated articles pertaining to the healthcare of adolescents.

Dina Romo, MD
718-918-4026
romod@nychhc.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

 

N512 Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine 

(Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)

The Pediatric Pulmonary Elective is a month long course that is open to residents of all levels.  It centers around the care of the patient with pulmonary disease in both inpatient and outpatient settings, including the intensive care unit.  Residents have the opportunity to experience continuity by following patients in both the inpatient and outpatient clinics.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:
-The physiology of lung function testing
-Evaluation of chest x-rays
-Respiratory disorders of the newborn with emphasis on bronchopulmonary dysplasia
-Common respiratory infections of the respiratory tract in children
-Pneumonia and management
-Asthma-NIH guidelines and management
-Sleep disorders in children

Learning experience: This one month elective provides the opportunity for students to develop skills in the field of pediatric pulmonology. The student will see a range of inpatient and outpatient pathology with an emphasis on asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, dysplasia and evaluation of the child with chronic cough, wheezing or stridor.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Evaluation to be completed using New Innovation

Suggest Textbook:
Kendig’s Disorders of the Respiratory Tract in Children E-Book 9th Edition, Kindle Edition
by Robert W. Wilmott, Andrew Bush, Robin R Deterding, Felix Ratjen, Peter Sly, Heather Zar, Albert Li
ISBN-13: 978-0323448871
ISBN-10: 0323448879
Price : Kindle edition $178.00

Raanan Arens, MD
rarens@montefiore.org
718-515-2330
Administrative support: Darlene D. Esquea, DESQUEA@montefiore.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1
On the first day students report to: House Staff at 8:30am (If ID is needed), then 3330 Bainbridge side door entrance at 9:00am


N519 Adolescent Medicine

(Children’s Hospital at Montefiore)

During the Adolescent Medicine rotation students will experience caring for patients aged 13 through 21 years in a wide variety of clinical and community-based settings within a nationally recognized Division of Adolescent Medicine and a sub-specialty fellowship training program with over two decades of fellow trainees, one of the first such fellowships in the country. The student will be part of the clinical team that includes three postdoctoral fellows, seven core faculty physicians and six affiliated physicians. Students will participate in the subspecialty practice at the children’s hospital providing primary care for gynecologic, pubertal, eating disorder, weight, dermatologic, orthopedic and behavioral concerns. In addition students will participate in our multidisciplinary weight management program (B’N Fit) for obese teens, our  internationally recognized Adolescent HIV/AIDS program, our Adolescent Long Acting Reversible Contraceptive (LARC) practice, and the 14-bed adolescent medicine inpatient service all at CHAM. Participation will including shadowing fellows and attendings in sub-specialty clinics; gaining experience in obtaining medical and psychosocial histories and attending educational sessions within the Division of Adolescent Medicine including lectures and journal clubs. Other opportunities for interested students include participation in a college-health service, an outpatient clinic for foster care adolescents, and residential schools for foster care youth with psychiatric and behavioral problems.

Measurable learning objectives of the elective:
– Identify physical, sexual and psychosocial development of adolescents
– Critique issues surrounding consent and confidentiality
– Practice communication skills and motivational interviewing
– Apply skills in effective psychosocial history taking
– Manage common concerns in adolescent gynecology, including menstrual disorders, sexually transmitted infections, and contraception
– Manage common adolescent problems such as acne, sports injuries, and abdominal pain
– Discuss the use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) and subdermal contraceptive implants with adolescents and observe insertions of these long acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs)

– Appraise the field of Adolescent Medicine and if interested, get mentorship towards a career in the field or towards an independent research project in the field

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Ongoing feedback will be provided during the elective and written evaluation will be completed by elective director

Textbook(s) information: No textbook is required, students will be provided with a packet of up to date review articles in topics relevant to adolescent medicine

Leslie Rosenthal, MD
lrosenthal@montefiore.org

Blocks: All
Maximum: 1
On the first day of the elective students will meet with Dr. Rosenthal at 9:30pam at 3411 Wayne apt 3K unless notified otherwise. They will also receive a detailed schedule by email prior to the start of the elective.  

 

Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (PSBS)

———————————————————————————————————————-

 

K531 Addiction Medicine

(Montefiore Medical Center)

The Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences offer this elective in Addiction Medicine to fourth-year students. Students will participate in clinical care in both inpatient and outpatient settings and will be responsible for working up and presenting patients to attending physicians. Inpatient experience will be with the Addiction Consult Service (ACS) at Weiler Hospital, which consults on hospitalized patients with substance use disorders and provides guidance on the management of acute issues such as withdrawal. Outpatient experiences will include observation and participation in the following settings: outpatient clinics in the Montefiore Division of Substance Abuse, which provide drug treatment services (including pharmacologic treatment of opiate use disorder with methadone and buprenorphine), as well as on-site medical and psychiatric care; a physician who prescribes buprenorphine at a community clinic; intensive outpatient addiction treatment program; a social service agency which provides medical and social work services based on a harm reduction model; 12 Step Meetings; and the medical service at Riker’s Island, the largest of NYC’s jails.

Melissa Stein, MD
mstein@montefiore.org
718-665-7500
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

Students must contact the course director for first day meeting time and location

 

P501 Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

(Montefiore Medical Center)

The Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry offers an elective for Medical Students on the child and adolescent psychiatry consult/liaison service with special emphasis on psychological and psycho-social functioning of children and their families. Interested students will be overseen by faculty in the division of child and adolescent psychiatry in the evaluation of children and adolescents in the pediatrics setting with medical illnesses complicated by co-morbid psychiatric disorders.

Measurable learning objectives of elective: Assessment and treatment planning for children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Assessment and consultation in the Pediatric setting of patients with neuropsychiatric issues.

Learning experience:

Patient care under attending supervision on the consultation – liaison service at the children’s hospital at Montefiore; the Montefiore child and adolescent child psychiatry outpatient clinic; and the psychiatric emergency service at Montefiore

Method of student feedback and evaluation:

Mid Cycle and end of rotation feedback meeting with site director. Evaluation completed by site director and shared with student at final meeting.

Suggested Textbook:
ISBN: 978-0-7817-6214-4
Title: Lewis’s Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Edition: Fourth
Author: Andrés Martin, Fred R. Volkmar

Scott Shaffer, MD
sshaffer@montefiore.org
718- 696-3025
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1 student

On the first day student must meet at Montefiore Medical Center – 3340 Bainbridge Avenue Bronx, NY 10467 (718) 696-3011

 

P507 Acute Hospital Psychiatry

(Jacobi Medical Center)

Students will join the staff of an active acute term general psychiatric inpatient unit, providing a rich variety of hands-on clinical experience. Students will evaluate and treat patients in crisis, with supervision by faculty, and become active members of an interdisciplinary team. Treatment modalities employed will include individual, group, family, and milieu therapy, relaxation training, and substance abuse therapies. Individual tutorials, case conferences, medical and research and psychopharmacology rounds, and departmental Grand Rounds will enhance students’ learning. Students will experience first-hand how an integrative model of care is applied in a brief inpatient treatment urban setting.

Learning objectives:

  • Develop interview skills
  • Perform a comprehensive evaluation of a psychiatric inpatient
  • Perform a good MSE
  • Create a clinically relevant differential diagnosis treatment
  • Develop treatment plans and be able to implement them

Learning experience:
9am – 5pm Monday – Friday

  • Working with a multidisciplinary team
  • Attending morning reports
  • Caseload of 6 -8 patients
  • Inpatient admissions, evaluations, treatment, discharge planning
  • Brief presentation of relevant clinical issues

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Individual supervision; team feedback; observed clinical exams; case write-ups.

Maryann Popiel, MD
maryann.popiel@nychhc.org
Administrative Support:
Leonora Lulaj at Leonora.lulaj@nychhc.org
718-918-4875
Blocks: All, except 1
Maximum: 1

On the first day students report to Jacobi Medical Center – Building #1, Room #9S4 at 10AM

 

P517 Consultation Liaison Service

(Montefiore Medical Center)

Student will receive general exposure to psychiatric consultation on the medically ill patient with the opportunity to become acquainted with liaison activities in the general hospital. The student will work under the direct supervision of attendings, fellows, and residents. Students who are interested will also have the opportunity to evaluate addiction and organ transplant patients who are admitted to the medical and surgical floors. Students who are interested should contact Dr. Maria Fernanda Gomez.

 Learning objectives:

  • Learn about psychiatric disorders and treatment in the medically ill
  • Perform evaluations and treatment planning of patient with medical and psychiatric comorbidities.

 Learning experience:

  • Work with different Consultation-Liaison attendings, fellows, residents, and trainees

Method of student feedback and evaluation:

  • Observation by Consultation-Liaison attendings, fellows, and residents
  • Oral case presentation
  • End of rotation feedback
  • Evaluation completed and discussed with student

Maria Gomez, MD
mfgomez@montefiore.org
718-920-2397
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1
First day: Students MUST contact the course director for first day meeting location and time

 

P528 Emergency Psychiatry

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**NOT OFFERED IN THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2022-2023**

Student will function as a junior attending under the supervision of the regular Psychiatric Observation Suite attending staff. Duties include initial evaluation and treatment of patients presenting to the psychiatric emergency room, participation in case conferences and in any ongoing research projects.

Rebecca Klein, MD
reklein@montefiore.org
718-920-7460
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1 student

First day: Psychiatric Observation Suite, Montefiore Medical Center, 8:30 AM

 

P537 Introduction to Geriatric Psychiatry

(Montefiore Medical Center)

Students will participate in the full range of geriatric psychiatry practice including home visits to persons with dementia as well as healthy older adults. Students will also visit a teaching nursing home and perform outpatient evaluations, both in the geriatric psychiatric and medical settings. Additional exposure to legal and ethical issues in geriatric care is also part of the experience. Students will participate in weekly case conferences at each clinical site, attend ongoing lectures and journal clubs in our collaborative care model with the Division of Geriatric Medicine. Students receive individual supervision from faculty and fellows of the Division of Geriatric Psychiatry. A variety of research investigations are also underway offering students the unique opportunity to participate in clinical research.

Textbook(s) information:
ISBN 978-1-4625-1986-6
Cost provided at no cost
Title Geriatric Depression: A Clinical Guide
Edition 1
Author Gary J. Kennedy

Gary J. Kennedy, MD
gkennedy@montefiore.org
718-920-4236
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

Students MUST contact the course director for first day meeting location and time

Radiation Oncology (RADO)

 

C504 Radiation Oncology

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**Visiting students must upload their USMLE Step I score report to VSAS in order to be considered for this elective**

Of the three principal modalities for treating cancer, Radiation Oncology is probably most unfamiliar to medical students. Spend a 2-week or 4-week elective with us so we can show you the secrets of one of the most technologically advanced fields in oncology. During this time, you will see and learn about:
• Linear accelerators
• Simulators
• Treatment planning systems
• Procedural (brachytherapy) radiation devices
• The newest addition to our line-up – The New York Proton Center (www.nyproton.com)
You will rotate with our expert faculty members who specialize in treatment for a particular cancer type and attend the respective interdisciplinary tumor board conferences:
• Central Nervous System cancer and metastases
• Head & Neck cancer
• Breast cancer
• Lung cancer
• Gastrointestinal cancer
• Genitourinary cancer
• Gynecologic cancer
• Bone and soft tissue cancer
• Skin cancer
• Pediatric cancer

You will be able to participate in specialized radiation treatments and procedures:
• Brachytherapy (intracavitary and interstitial)
• Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS)
• Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)
• Intra-operative Radiation Therapy (IORT)

There will be ample opportunity to link up with a faculty member for clinical research and/or laboratory research. At the end of the elective, you will have the opportunity to present a talk on a subject in Radiation Oncology or a related field of research in which you are interested. All you need to bring is enthusiasm! We look forward to meeting you.

Keyur Mehta, MD
kmehta@montefiore.org
718-920-7750
Contact: Mr. Luke Mark, umark@montefiore.org, 718-920-5062
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2

First day students meet in Radiation Oncology Department, Yellow Zone, Montefiore Medical Center-Moses Division, 9:00 A.M.

Radiology (RADI)

 

C400J Diagnostic Radiology

(Jacobi Medical Center)

This four-week elective in Diagnostic Radiology can be taken any time after the required two-week Radiology Clerkship. Its purpose is to familiarize the student with imaging procedures, their importance in the diagnostic armamentaria, and with an intelligent approach to order imaging studies and filling out imaging consultation requests in a manner that will aid the radiologist in making as precise a diagnosis as possible. The student will understand the physical consequences to the patient and final impact on society of specific imaging studies. The student will achieve sufficient understanding of common imaging studies to be able to engage in a more meaningful dialog with the radiologist consultant. The student will attend didactic lectures specifically for the students and participate procedures will enable the student to understand the stress patients have to endure in these procedures as well as give the student a better three-dimensional idea of imaging anatomy. The student will participate in image interpretation in an active manner. The student will be assessed by the attendings and residents with whom they interact, and a quiz may be given at the completion of the elective. In addition, the student may undertake a research project with one of the faculty members. Such a project may require additional time and/or ongoing work after the elective is complete. If suitable, the project may be submitted for publication.

Robert Friedman, MD
Contact: Ms. Cassandra Johnson, 718-918-3612 or 646-796-5359, Cassandra.Johnson@nychhc.org
Blocks: All except 3
Maximum: 6
On the first day students should report to Jacobi Medical Center, Building #1, 4th floor, room 4N69. Rotation starts at 8:00 am on the first day of rotation for morning conference. 

 

C508 Emergency Radiology

(Jacobi Medical Center)

The emergency radiology elective is designed to familiarize the student with all imaging modalities of use in acutely ill patients. This will include the interpretation of emergency room x-ray and CT scans of acutely ill patients. In addition the student will observe all further procedures carried out on the admitted patient as well as attend all radiology conferences. This elective will include about half time with the attending radiologist reviewing studies performed on ER patients, one fourth of the period will be spend with house staff and one forth in conference with radiology residents and attendings. In addition, the student may be asked to research any ongoing projects in emergency radiology.

Robert Friedman, MD
Contact: Ms. Cassandra Johnson, 718-918-3612 or 646-796-5359, Cassandra.Johnson@nychhc.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2
On the first day students should report to Jacobi Medical Center, Building #1, 4th floor, room 4N69. Rotation starts at 8:00 am on the first day of rotation for morning conference. 

 

 

C510 Neuroradiology

(Montefiore Medical Center)

The neuroradiology elective is designed to introduce students to all aspects of diagnostic imaging in the brain, head/neck, and spine. The student will participate in daily sessions of inpatient and outpatient CT and MR cross-sectional imaging interpretation, communication of urgent results to clinicians, formal and informal consultations with clinical services, and the protocoling of imaging studies. The student will gain familiarity with appropriate use of imaging for common clinical questions, pertinent imaging anatomy, the principles of CT and MR imaging, and the role of the neuroradiology inpatient workup and management. Students are invited to attend weekly adult and pediatric neuro and head and neck tumor boards. Once familiar with imaging anatomy, and clinical indications for procedures, students may observe procedures such as myelography, angiography, stroke intervention, endovascular embolization, and pain management under the direct supervision of faculty.

Learning Objectives:

  • Imaging anatomy of the CNS
  • Basic principles of CT, MR imaging
  • Indications for common clinical scenarios requiring CNS imaging
  • Appropriateness of imaging workup for clinical indications (ACR appropriateness criteria)
  • Clinical correlation of imaging findings in the CNS

Learning Experience:

  • Students participate in cross-sectional imaging interpretation, including discussion of indications, protocoling, findings, and differential diagnosis, as well as “next step” management.
  • Students are assigned reading pertinent to discussions, with “report back”
  • Students are expected to attend daily radiology resident teaching conferences from 8-9 am and 12:30-2 pm in Binswanger Auditorium, unless otherwise engaged in neuro specific activities (tumor boards, etc)

Student Feedback and Evaluation: Students will prepare a 15 minute presentation for the neuroradiology team on a case or topic encountered during the elective focusing on the role of neuroradiology in the clinical workup and management of the patient. Course faculty will provide oral feedback and submit the AECOM standard evaluation to the medical school.

Andrew C. McClelland, MD
amcclell@montefiore.org
718 920 4030
Administrative Support: Amanda Cruz, acruz@montefiore.org, 718 920 4030
Maximum: 1-2
Blocks: All

On the first day students report to: Binswanger Auditorium at 8 am for general radiology conference; 9 am neuroradiology reading room

 

C511 Ultrasound Radiology

(Montefiore Medical Center/Weiler Hospital)

VISITING STUDENTS MUST UPLOAD A STEP 1 SCORE REPORT IN ORDER TO BE CONSIDERED FOR THIS ELECTIVE

This elective will serve to familiarize the student with Ultrasound scanning techniques and image interpretation. Emphasis will be on acquiring anatomical concepts and an appreciation of how pathology departs from normal. The student will be expected to first observe scanning in the examining room, and then to acquire hands on skill in performing the ultrasound examinations. Approximately half the time will be spent with the attendings and fellows in film interpretation and conferences. Correlation between ultrasound, other imaging modalities, and pathology will be made if it is appropriate. There will also be opportunity for the student to engage in research if desired.

Mordecai Koenigsberg, MD
718-920-5511
mkoenigs@montefiore.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

Students must contact Dr. Koenigsberg for meeting time and location.

 

C513 Interventional Radiology

(Weiler Hospital)

**Einstein Students Must Contact Dr. Gohari for approval prior to registration**

This elective module is four weeks. Students will actively participate in clinical case conferences and tumor boards. Students will partake in pre-procedure and clinical appropriateness discussions. The students will be active participants in the procedures, with hands-on exposure. Experience gained in this elective will help the students in understanding and performance of wide spectrum of interventional radiology procedures such as ultrasound guidance for vascular access ( PICC lines and other central vascular access catheters), Ultrasound/ CT/ fluoroscopic guided procedures such as thoracentesis and paracentesis, pulmonary artery thrombectomy/thrombolysis, arterial embolizations.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:

  • Acquire knowledge of indications and contraindications for common interventional procedures
  • Demonstrate knowledge of arterial and venous anatomy important to interventional radiology
  • Perform pre-procedure evaluations for most common procedures
  • Apply indications and contra-indications to common procedures

Students will participate in consultation, management and treatment of patients referred to the vascular and Interventional Radiology service.

Students will have the opportunity to assist in interventional procedures.

The rotation starts normally at 8:00 AM, and cases are performed throughout the day into the evening. Students are not required to stay late and work into the evening. Students do not take evening, night or weekend call. Students are normally free to leave after 5:00 PM.

Research is encouraged. Students interested in IR research should contact elective director to delineate a suitable research project and sign up for the research module via the research elective pathway.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
Students will give a 15 min oral presentation to the Interventional Radiology Team on an Interventional Radiology topic of their choice or a case presentation with relevant literature review of the topic. Assessment will be a written review of the student that will be submitted to the medical school, in accordance with Einstein policy. In addition, a verbal discussion with the student by the course director(s) will take place, at which time the student will be asked for a 360 assessment of the IR service, the student experience and methods to improve the elective. Anonymous student feedback will also be encouraged to be submitted directly to the director of the Einstein Radiology Student Clerkships, in a manner that will truly allow honest feedback.

Textbook information:
ISBN: 978-3-319-17238-5
Cost: $65
Title: Demystifying Interventional Radiology: A Guide for Medical Students
Edition: First
Author: Athreya, Sriharsha
Is this required or suggested? Suggested

Arash Gohari, MD
agohari@montefiore.org
Phone: 718-904-2965
Maximum: 1
Blocks: All except 2

On the first day students report to: Radiology Reading Room W 3009 at 9:00 am

 

C600 Radiology Subinternship

(Montefiore Medical Center)

VISITING STUDENTS MUST UPLOAD A STEP 1 SCORE REPORT IN ORDER TO BE CONSIDERED FOR THIS ELECTIVE

This four week elective in diagnostic radiology can be taken any time after the required two week Radiology clerkship. This elective allows the student access to daily film interpretation in the subspecialty of their choice and, if desired by the student an active part in the procedural aspects of Diagnostic Radiology. Daily morning and afternoon teaching conferences are held. Teaching cases and reading materials supplement the teaching program. All effort will be made to accommodate the student in his/her choice of subspecialty or subspecialties. He/she may participate in general radiological interpretations, conferences and seminars. The student will be assessed by the attending with whom they interact. In addition, they will be required to deliver a 15-minute oral presentation on the radiological manifestations of a topic of their choice. In addition, the student may undertake a research project with one of the faculty members. Such a project may require additional time and/or ongoing work after the elective is complete. If suitable, the project may be submitted for publication.

Learning objectives and experience: depends on student’s concentration

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Written and oral feedback based on performance including oral presentation at end of elective

Marjorie W. Stein, MD
marstein@montefiore.org
Contact: Ms. Lourdes Sicignano, 718-920-4872, lsicigna@montefiore.org
Blocks: All except 3
Maximum: 1 (subject to change)

On the first day report to Gold Zone main floor -radiology administration office, room G133 at 9 AM

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (PLSU)

 

A403 Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

(Montefiore Medical Center)

The Plastic and Reconstructive surgery elective will provide a broad exposure to our specialty. Our plastic surgery service has 8 full-time faculty and 3 part-time faculty who perform over 2,400 cases per year. As Plastic surgery has no defined territory of the body, we have quite varied and diverse patients and complex challenges that require creative solutions.  The breadth of plastic surgery includes craniofacial surgery, hand surgery, aesthetic surgery, and general reconstructive surgery.  General reconstructive surgery, including breast reconstruction, head and neck reconstruction, and body contouring, is the primary focus of this elective, and the bulk of plastic surgery practice.  Students will gain exposure and understanding to the basic principles of plastic surgery and introduction to the reconstructive ladder. They will additionally be instructed on proper tissue handling and surgical techniques.

Students will be expected to be formal members of the team which includes attending surgeons, resident surgeons, physician assistants, and nursing staff. They will participate in daily plastic surgery morning rounds (including data collection, note writing, patient management, list preparation, and dressing changes), operative case assignments, drain removal and daily patient care, and surgical consultations with the consulting resident.  Students participating in an elective longer than one week will be required to take 2 weekend nights of buddy call with the resident for increased exposure and learning to overnight consults and patient management. Students will be expected to participate in weekly conferences and prepare a 15-minute presentation on a topic of their interest at the end of the elective.

Measurable learning objectives of elective 

  • Participating in daily morning rounds and afternoon rounds at the Moses Campus with the Plastic Surgery Team
  • Participate in daily plastic surgery cases at the Moses campus, the Weiler campus, and Hutch campus with the team’s residents and faculty
  • Attend at least one ½ day of clinic per week for exposure to outpatient plastic surgery
  • Participate in skin closure, dressings, and dressing changes on floor patients and in the OR
  • Attend weekly plastic surgery conferences.
  • Take overnight call in compliance with the ACGME and 405 regulations once during each two-week period
  • Prepare and deliver a 15-minute presentation at the end of the rotation on a topic of the student’s interest.

Learning experience: In general students will be expected to experience the life of a Plastic Surgery Resident to gain as much exposure to the field as possible. Much of plastic surgery is hands-on learning in the operating room and seeing consultations. Students are encouraged to be proactive and take initiative by learning dressings and anticipating the needs of the team. They will be expected to read the patients history prior to surgery, prepare for the surgery, and round on the patient after the surgery including note writing and presentation on rounds.  They will help with management and preparation of the patient list in the morning, attend surgical cases in the day at various campuses, and round again with the team in the evening.  Students are encouraged to see as many different types of cases to gain the broadest exposure to plastic surgery.  Finally, they will be expected to attend ½ day of clinic per week with an Attending surgeon.  In clinic, they will be required to see the patient and present to the attending physician, and document an outpatient note.  Each day will end when the team is done with surgeries, consults, and other responsibilities.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Students will be evaluated daily in the OR with direct feedback based on preparedness for cases and performance with the team. They will also be formally evaluated using the Einstein evaluation at the end of the rotation.  At the midpoint of the rotation, the student will meet with the chief resident at the Moses Campus for feedback.

Suggested Textbook:
ISBN: 978-1626236578
Cost: $99.00
Title: Essentials of Plastic Surgery
Edition: Second
Author: Jeffery E Janis

Lawrence Draper, MD
ladraper@montefiore.org
718-920-6168
Administrative support: Agneta Gustafasson, agustafs@montefiore.org, 718-920-6168
Maximum: 3
Blocks: All

On the first day students report to: Moses C3 plastic surgery workroom at 5:45 am (prior to elective should contact Agneta Gustafasson who will put the student in contact with the chief resident at Moses campus who will give further instructions).

 

A500 Burn Surgery

(Jacobi Medical Center)

**Visiting students are encouraged to contact the course director prior to registration**

The Burn Unit at Jacobi Medical Center is one of the busiest burn units in the state of New York. Founded more than 40 years ago, it admits approximately 200 patients per year and manages 1,400 ambulatory visits annually. The service provides initial lifesaving intervention, critical care, primary and secondary surgical reconstruction, rehabilitation, and outpatient specialty follow-up. Burn fellows, plastic and reconstructive surgery residents, general surgery residents, and physician assistants staff the burn unit. Functioning essentially as a subintern, the student will fully participate in the care of all burn patients and be assigned specific patients as they are admitted during the elective. He/She will be given responsibility for all phases of clinical management of the burn patient. Detailed care of both critically injured burn patients, as well as routine care of less-seriously injured burn patients, will be included. He/She will present and discuss patients at daily rounds. The student will participate in weekly didactic activities and conferences presented by house staff and faculty. By scrubbing in the operating room, he/she will develop many skills necessary for the operative treatment of the burn patient. Pre and postoperative care will be offered in an ICU setting, providing the student with a solid foundation in critical care. Moreover, the student will have the opportunity to follow patients in the outpatient setting so as to maintain continuity of care. The student will be closely supervised, but will have increasing responsibility in the day-to-day clinical setting, complementing nursing, physical and occupational therapy, social service, rehabilitation medicine, and other ancillary services. Students will take on site call (complying with 405 regulations and ACGME guidelines) accompanied by a burn fellow and will be responsible for patients admitted during their on-call days in conjunction with other house officers. As the burn service functions under the auspices of the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Jacobi, the student will also gain exposure to plastic and reconstructive surgical patients in the operating room, emergency department, and clinics.

Learning objectives of elective: Learning objectives of the burn elective aspire to achieve Einstein Educational Competencies as follows:
Competency A: Physician as healer
Competency B: Physician as scientist
Competency C: Physician as advocate
Competency D: Physician as educator
Competency E: Physician as colleague
Competency F: Physician as role model
Competency G: Physician as life-long learner

1. Learn burn physiology and nutrition in all types of injuries (thermal, electrical, chemical and inhalation injuries). [Competency A, B, G].
2. Recite the pathologic response to disruption of normal skin anatomy and physiology. [Competency A, B, G].
Outline the principles of immunologic alteration, and bacteriologic pathology of the burn wound. [Competency A, B, G].
3.
Learn the immediate care of burn patients and associated wounds. [Competency A, B, G].
4.
Discuss the acute and sub-acute options for burn wound coverage and closure. [Competency A, B, G].
5. Discuss essential principles of plastic surgery in approaching burn reconstruction. [Competency A, B, G].
Describe the physical, emotional, and occupational rehabilitation of the burn patient. [Competency A, B, E, F, G].
6.
Appreciate the critical mandate to educate communities in burn prevention to ensure patient safety and high quality of care. [Competency C, D, E, F].
7.
Appreciate the roles and contributions of the various members of the interdisciplinary team involved in the care of the burn patient in accordance with the principles of system based practice. [Competency E, F].
8.
Assimilate the scientific method in evidence based medical practice to improve the care of the burn patient. [Competency A, B, G].

Learning experience:

  • Participate in daily morning rounds in the burn unit.
  • Participate in daily interdisciplinary rounds in the burn unit.
  • Participate in didactic conferences given by house staff and faculty discussing topics on burn care and management.
  • Manage critically ill patients in the burn unit under the direct supervision of faculty and senior burn fellows.
  • Staff burn and plastics cases in the operating room.
  • Staff burn, plastics, and hand clinics.
  • Consult in the emergency department and floors along with senior burn fellows and faculty.
  • Present cases at burn rounds.
  • Consult and interact with other services.
  • Take on site call accompanied by a burn fellow in compliance with 405 and ACGME guidelines.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Students will be evaluated using the standard Albert Einstein College of Medicine evaluation form currently used for 4th year surgical electives. Evaluation and feedback will come at the end of each two-week period.

Ralph Wm. Liebling, MD
718-918-7000
ralph.liebling@nychhc.org
Contact: Jasmine Morris, morrisj8@nychhc.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2 students

On the first-day students report to Burn Unit (Jacobi Medical Center, Building #6, Second Floor 2A) at 7 AM

Rehabilitation Medicine (REME)

 

J501 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

(Montefiore Medical Center: Moses and Wakefield, Beth Abraham Health Services)

This 4-week elective will introduce the student to the specialty of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMR) in inpatient acute, subacute, and long-term care settings as well as in outpatient venues that span the full spectrum of physiatric specialty and subspecialty services. The student will have the opportunity to observe the planning and implementation of both physical medicine and rehabilitation care, including acute and subacute general rehabilitation, neuromusculoskeletal care, cardiac rehabilitation, and pediatric rehabilitation. The student will have opportunities to participate in diverse subspecialty services including electrodiagnosis, prosthetics, orthotics, spasticity management, spinal cord injury rehabilitation, wheelchair and durable medical equipment services, complementary and alternative medicine care, and interventional pain management.

Students may assist in various physiatric procedures including joint and soft tissue injections, botulinum toxin injections, neurolytic blocks, myofascial manual medicine techniques, and ultrasound or fluoroscopic guided procedures. The student will observe and participate in the interdisciplinary rehabilitation team process and become familiar with the treatment modalities employed by physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech and language pathologists. The roles of music and recreation therapies as well as rehabilitation social workers and vocational counselors will be addressed. The student will participate in the PMR residency didactic program, including journal clubs, lectures, and all other educational presentations.

The student will spend one week on the Wakefield acute inpatient rehabilitation unit to participate in daily work and teaching rounds, as well as team conferences. The student will spend one whole week in the outpatient rehabilitation setting, and one week split between subacute rehabilitation and the outpatient setting. The student will spend one week in a rehabilitation selective; the student will submit their choices between Interventional Pain Management, Sports Medicine, Cardiac Rehab, Women’s Health Rehab, and Electrodiagnosis (EMG).

Measurable Learning objectives:

  • Understand of the role of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in different clinical settings
  • Differentiate the role of physiatrists and physical/occupation/speech-language therapies
  • Identify common neuromusculoskeletal disorders and their management
  • Appreciate different physiatric interventions

Learning experience:

The elective will be split between inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation. The student will spend one week on the Wakefield acute inpatient rehabilitation unit to participate in daily work and teaching rounds, as well as team conferences. The student will spend one whole week in the outpatient rehabilitation setting, and one week split between subacute rehabilitation and the outpatient setting. The fourth week with consist of a rehabilitation selective; the student will choose between Interventional Pain Management, Sports Medicine, Cardiac Rehab, Women’s Health Rehab, and Electrodiagnosis (EMG). Students may assist in various physiatric procedures including joint and soft tissue injections, botulinum toxin injections, neurolytic blocks, myofascial manual medicine techniques, and ultrasound or fluoroscopic guided procedures. The student will observe and participate in the interdisciplinary rehabilitation team process and become familiar with the treatment modalities employed by physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech and language pathologists. The roles of music and recreation therapies as well as rehabilitation social workers and vocational counselors will be addressed. The student will participate in the PMR residency didactic program, including journal clubs, lectures, and all other educational presentations.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: An end of rotation evaluation will be compiled by the course director through input from the faculty with whom the student has rotated.

Suggested Textbooks:

ISBN-13: 978-0838578537
Cost: $147.24 new, used available from $8.17
Title: Physical Examination of the Spine and Extremities
Edition:1st
Author:Stanley Hoppenfeld

Stephanie Rand, DO
srand@montefiore.org
718-920-2413
Administrative Support: Wilhelmenia Williams-Aponte
wwilliam@montefiore.org
Blocks: All expect block 3
Maximum: 3 students

On the first day students report to:  Rehab Medicine, 150 East 210th Street, Montefiore Medical Center-Moses at 8:30AM. 

Detailed location and time schedule will be provided at or prior to the start of the elective.

 

J504 Introduction to Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

(Jacobi Medical Center)

A four-week introductory clerkship in PMR to provide exposure to the scope of services provided by the specialty. Students will have the opportunity to rotate in the various inpatient and outpatient settings at both Jacobi and North Central Bronx Hospital. The student will participate in the various clinics that include: Injection clinic, interventional procedures, Musculoskeletal clinics, electrodiagnostics, Back Clinic and orthotics and prosthetics. In addition, the student will be exposed to the inpatient rehab service and the management of an acute stroke patient, from the initial consult, to the admission to the rehab floor, to the team conference to discharge planning. Didactic on Shoulder examination, back examination and the evaluation of a stroke patient.

Core Objectives:
To evaluate the shoulder and the back and determine which patients are appropriate for interventional procedures and the techniques involved in the procedures. To evaluate the stroke patient for their physiatric need, expected functional outcomes and team conference leadership. Residents, fellows, and attendings provide small group interactive didactics, clinical guidance and supervision and daily feedback regarding clinical and presentation skills. At the end of the rotation there is one required 15-minute oral case presentation, based upon a diagnosis seen in the outpatient or inpatient setting.

Learning Goals:

1. To become familiar with the patient populations that physiatrists treat.
2. To understand the unique roles physiatrists play as medical specialists in the care of patients with musculoskeletal disorders
3. To understand the indications for referral of patients to physiatrists.
4. To become proficient in the examination of the shoulder and the back

Michelle Stern, MD
michelle.stern@nychhc.org
718-918-5549
Blocks: All
Maximum: 6

Surgery (SURG)

A400 Vascular Surgery

(Montefiore Medical Center)

This four week clinical experience is meant to provide an in-depth exposure to vascular medicine and surgery for the medical student who has completed the require Junior year clerkship in general surgery. The student will be an integral part of the vascular surgical service and act as a sub-intern with patient exposure in the hospital through daily rounds and the operating room, and in the office seeing outpatients. Students will participate in vascular surgical procedures, angioplasties, and other newer interventions performed on the service including the management of arterial and venous disease of both the upper and lower extremities. Students will gain a broad experience in caring for patients with lower extremity occlusive disease, carotid Disease, aortic disease and dialysis access. An introduction for the non-invasive vascular laboratory and vascular radiology will also be a part of this elective.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:

  • Be able to take a thorough history and physical exam specifically tailored to Vascular Surgery patients
  • Gain a basic understanding of non-invasive Vascular Lab imaging
  • Begin to interpret other Vascular imaging
  • Be able to formulate a differential diagnosis
  • Begin to formulate a treatment plan for patients with Vascular disease

Suggested Textbook(s) information:
ISBN: 9781455753048
Cost: $409
Title: Rutherford’s Vascular Surgery
Edition: 9th
Author: Cronenwet & Johnston
ISBN: 9781455746019
Cost: $200
Title: Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Edition: 8th
Author: Moore

Evan Lipsitz, MD
718-920-2016
elipsitz@montefiore.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 2 students

On the first day students report to MAP 4 at 9:00 am. Students should call the week prior to confirm.

 

A403 Subinternship in Surgery

(Montefiore Medical Center)

**Not offered to International Exchange Students**

The Department of Surgery Subinternship is a 4th year rotation intended for students planning to pursue surgery as a career. This rotation is focused on preparing students for their surgery internship following completion of medical school. During the 4 or 8 week rotation students will function as a PGY-1 on the surgery services at the Montefiore Medical Center divisions of Weiler and Moses. Students can choose between the Weiler and Moses general surgery, trauma surgery and surgical critical care services and may choose to split the rotation into 4 week blocks at two of the three sites depending on particular interests and availability. If the 4 week rotation is selected, students will only rotate on one service. The rotation options are listed below by site and service. During the subinternship students will have an in-depth exposure to the surgery services which will include seeing patients on the in-patient wards, in the emergency room and in the outpatient clinics. Students will participate in operative cases appropriate for the PGY-1 level of experience and will take call overnight on the general surgery or trauma surgery services averaging once weekly during the rotation. As a subintern, students will be called first for patient issues on the inpatient wards and will work closely with the overnight consult resident. Subinterns will be responsible for the primary evaluation of some patients and for presenting these patients to chief residents and attendings. Attendance at surgical morbidity and mortality conference and specialty-specific conferences will also be required

Learning objectives of elective:
The objective of this subinternship is to prepare fourth year students both practically and intellectually for the first year of all surgical residencies. Additional surgery 4th year electives are available to explore the surgical specialties in addition to this subinternship.

Learning experience:
Responsibilities and duties will include seeing consultations and new patients in the inpatient and outpatient setting, participating in operative cases and following patients both pre- and post-operatively. As a subintern students will function at the level of a first year surgery resident and will be the first call for patient issues on their respective service. Attendance at surgical morbidity and mortality conference and specialty-specific conferences will also be required. In-house call will be required on a regular rotation basis (generally once per week) where the student will see consultations from the in-patient wards and the emergency room. Basic technical skills including suturing, abscess drainage, chest tube placement, venipuncture, IV placement, arterial line placement, (assisting with) central line placement (in the SICU) and first and second assisting in the operating room will be taught and practiced throughout the rotation.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
Students will be evaluated and given feedback at the mid-rotation for formative purposes by the attendings on their rotation using the Einstein form for mid-rotation evaluation. At the completion of the rotation students will be evaluated by the members of the faculty on the services which they rotated and can solicit letters of recommendation for applications to surgery residency programs.

Sub-Internship Director
General Surgery
Francis B. Baccay, MD
fbaccay@montefiore.org 
Blocks: All, except 9
Maximum: TBD

Once registration is finalized it is absolutely essential that the student MUST contact the Course Director for the sites where they will be rotating at least two weeks prior to the rotation start date to allow for specialty assignment and to complete arrangements of computer access, OR scrubs, and ID/pass.

 

A404 Trauma/Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care

(Jacobi Medical Center)

During this 4 week elective, the student will get an introduction to the complex critical care management of the surgical patient and the critically-injured patient. The student will also be expected to participate and understand the principles of trauma resuscitations and advance trauma life support.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:

  1. To identify the different types of shock and their management.
  2. To understand the guiding principles of a trauma resuscitation.
  3. To learn the understand the differences in management of the critically injured and surgical patient.

Learning experience: 2 weeks SICU, 2 weeks trauma (including one week night float)

Method of student feedback and evaluation: In person

Anna Liveris, MD
anna.liveris@nychhc.org
718.918.5590
Administrative support: Evelyn Ramos, ramose11@nychhc.org, 718-918-5590
Max: 2 students
Modules: ALL

On the first day students report to: Jacobi Building 1, Suite 1213 at 8am 

 

A604 Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Surgery

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses)

The student will participate in the inpatient and outpatient care of transplantation surgery and hepatobiliary surgery patients. The student’s responsibilities will include:

 

1. The student will actively participate in the operating room cases. The degree of participation will be based upon the student’s technical skills. Such operative activities will include deceased donor abdominal organ recovery, living donor and deceased donor transplantation, non-transplant hepatic surgery, and dialysis access surgery.

2. The student will learn how to interview and examine newly presenting patients, as well as how to formulate a care plan. The student will conduct day-to-day follow-up, allowing for continuity of care.

3. The student will participate in the outpatient hepatobiliary and transplant clinics, where patients will be examined and assessed. The student’s work will be reviewed with residents and attending surgeons.

4. The student will attend departmental transplant conferences, which include organ selection committee meetings, morbidity and mortality conference, and hepatic tumor board. The student will be included in additional didactic and research-based meetings as they are scheduled.

 

During this rotation the student will take call on a regular rotation and function as a PGY-1: rounding on patients, following through on decisions made on rounds, creating documentation for patient care, and collaborating with the residents to address the needs of the patients that arise during the admission. By the end of the rotation it is expected that the student will have a good level-appropriate understanding of all aspects of liver, kidney, and pancreas transplantation, including workup of a prospective candidate, management of immunosuppression, post-operative management of transplant patients, and dynamics of multi-organ donation.

Hillary Yaffe, MD
718-920-7303
hiyaffe@montefiore.org
Blocks: All
Maximum: 1

A501 Adult and Pediatric Urology

(Montefiore Medical Center – Moses Campus)

The purpose of the elective is to get exposed to the field of Urologic Surgery. During the elective, the student will function as a sub-intern on the service with direct, supervised patient care. The exposure to the field and our service will also allow for interested students who are considering Urology as a career choice to get exposed to all areas of adult and pediatric Urologic surgery with special emphasis on minimally invasive (robotic and laparoscopic and endourological) and oncologic and reconstructive surgery. The student will have ample opportunity to formulate and arrange for clinical research opportunities with individual faculty members in their areas of subspecilalty interest.

Measurable learning objectives of elective:

  • Proficiency in assessment of the Urologic patient and diagnostic skills
  • Procedural proficiency with minor urologic interventions
  • In-patient care of the acutely ill Urologic patient
  • The preoperative workup of Urologic patients with clinical follow though in the operating room
  • The post-operative care
  • Exposure to independent thinking and clinical research
  • Exposure to clinical data entry and database research

Suggested Reading: Smith’s Textbook of Urology

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Verbal and written evaluations are provided and reviewed by course director

Melissa Laudano, MD
mlaudano@montefiore.org
Administrative Support: Connie Matos, comatos@montefiore.org, 347-842-1742
Maximum: 3
Blocks: All

Students should contact Dr. Laudano 1 week prior to the start of the rotation for meeting location and time. If the proposed rotation dates conflict with your schedule please contact Dr. Laudano or Connie Matos directly.

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